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Results 21 - 40 of 66.


History / Archeology - 24.04.2024
Social change may explain decline in genetic diversity of the Y chromosome at the end of the Neolithic period
Social change may explain decline in genetic diversity of the Y chromosome at the end of the Neolithic period
The emergence in the Neolithic of patrilineal 1 social systems, in which children are affiliated with their father's lineage, may explain a spectacular decline in the genetic diversity of the Y chromosome 2 observed worldwide between 3,000 and 5,000 years ago. In a study to be published on 24 April in Nature Communications, a team of scientists from the CNRS, MNHN and Université Paris Cité 3 suggest that these patrilineal organisations had a greater impact on the Y chromosome than mortality during conflict.

Astronomy / Space - Physics - 24.04.2024
Gaia BH3, the black hole that shouldn’t exist
The recent discovery of a binary system containing an extremely rare object, the most massive black hole (apart from SgrA*) ever detected in our Galaxy, calls into question the models for the formation of these bodies. Up until now, the Gaia space observatory has been used to observe the position and motion of stars, uncover the underlying structures of our Galaxy, and find new exoplanets.

Life Sciences - Health - 24.04.2024
Discovering cancers of epigenetic origin without DNA mutation
Discovering cancers of epigenetic origin without DNA mutation
A research team including scientists from the CNRS 1 has discovered that cancer, one of the leading causes of death worldwide, can be caused entirely by epigenetic changes 2 , in other words, changes that contribute to how gene expression is regulated, and partly explain why, despite an identical genome, an individual develops very different cells (neurons, skin cells, etc.

Health - Agronomy / Food Science - 24.04.2024
The consumption of certain food additive emulsifiers could be associated with the risk of developing type 2 diabetes
The consumption of certain food additive emulsifiers could be associated with the risk of developing type 2 diabetes
Emulsifiers are among the additives most widely used by the food industry, helping to improve the texture of food products and extend their shelf life. Researchers from Inserm, INRAE, Université Sorbonne Paris Nord, Université Paris Cité and Cnam, as part of the Nutritional Epidemiology Research Team (CRESS-EREN), studied the possible links between the dietary intake of food additive emulsifiers and the onset of type 2 diabetes between 2009 and 2023.

Environment - Agronomy / Food Science - 23.04.2024
Emotion can also cause chickens to get red in the face
How can we know what chickens are feeling? An INRAE research team were able to uncover various degrees of redness on chickens' faces depending on their emotional state, while, at the same time, demonstrating that the skin of chickens that were used to humans stayed lighter in colour, thereby indicating a calmer state when humans were nearby.

Health - Agronomy / Food Science - 23.04.2024
The consumption of certain food additive emulsifiers could be associated with the risk of developing type 2 diabetes
Emulsifiers are among the additives most widely used by the food industry, helping to improve the texture of food products and extend their shelf life. Researchers from Inserm, INRAE, Université Sorbonne Paris Nord, Université Paris Cité and Cnam, as part of the Nutritional Epidemiology Research Team (CRESS-EREN), studied the possible links between the dietary intake of food additive emulsifiers and the onset of type 2 diabetes between 2009 and 2023.

Health - Agronomy / Food Science - 18.04.2024
Displaying the Nutri-Score in advertisements would lead to healthier food choices
Displaying the Nutri-Score in advertisements would lead to healthier food choices
For the first time, a study by a multi-disciplinary team of researchers from Aix-Marseille Université and Sorbonne Paris Nord University, including specialists in the fields of communication, nutrition, epidemiology and public health, has shown that displaying the Nutri-Score on food products in advertisements would lead consumers to choose healthier foods.

Physics - 18.04.2024
Flow-induced structural reponses of attractive colloidal dispersions
Publication of the Physics Laboratory in the Journal of Rheology on April 11, 2024. In a recent study, a team of scientists led by researchers from the Physics Laboratory of ENS de Lyon (CNRS/ENS de Lyon) focused on the flow-induced responses of colloidal dispersions. Their work provides a better understanding of how colloids structure themselves under the effect of shear, an important step towards understanding this essential process in many industrial applications.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 18.04.2024
The Earth, precariously balanced
Aerial view of slash-and-burn agriculture in the state of Amazonas, western Brazil (September 2022). On our planet, everything is interconnected, from terrestrial and marine ecosystems and biodiversity to ice sheets, rivers and oceans. But a recent report reveals that the dynamics of these different systems is being destabilised by human activities to such an extent that they are reaching points of no return.

Life Sciences - 18.04.2024
Axons follow a signposted path to reach their muscular target
Publication of the IGFL in the journal PNAS on March 19, 2024. News by CNRS Biology on April 12, 2024. During embryonic development, motor neurons, located in the spinal cord, emit extensions - the axons - which must find their way to their targets - the muscle cells. These motoneurons, last link between electrical and mechanical signals in the locomotor system, trigger movement via their axons.

Health - Pharmacology - 17.04.2024
Preventing cardiovascular risk thanks to a tool for measuring arterial stiffness
Cardiovascular diseases represent the leading cause of death worldwide . Preventing cardiovascular risk by identifying the people most susceptible to these diseases is a major public health challenge. In a new study in this field, researchers from Inserm, Université de Lorraine and Nancy Regional University Hospital opted to focus on arterial stiffness and how it changes with age, given that ageing is associated with a loss of arterial flexibility.

Life Sciences - Health - 14.04.2024
Muting tinnitus
Research on tinnitus, a recent investigative field, is now enabling a clearer understanding of the causes and effects of this symptom that affects nearly eight million people in France. Buzzing, hissing, creaking, ringing, clicking or humming; according to a recent French study, although 23 million French people over the age of 15 have experienced tinnitus once in their lives, between four and seven million of them suffer from it on a permanent basis.

Life Sciences - 10.04.2024
Menstrual cycle regularity: a biological clock driven by the moon?
Because of their cyclical rhythm and similar durations, the menstrual and lunar cycles have often been assumed to be linked, despite no solid evidence so far to support this. To gain a better understanding of the origin of the rhythmic regularity of the menstrual cycle, an international research team involving Inserm, CNRS and Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1 compared a large amount of data on cycles collected from studies conducted in Europe and North America.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 10.04.2024
A rich 125,000-year-old coastal ecosystem discovered under Ariane 6 in French Guiana
A rich 125,000-year-old coastal ecosystem discovered under Ariane 6 in French Guiana
An international consortium of paleontologists, geologists and biologists describes the discovery of fossil assemblages spanning the last 130,000 years beneath the Ariane 6 rocket launch site in Kourou, French Guiana. The consortium, coordinated by scientists from the Montpellier Institute of Evolutionary Sciences (Université de Montpellier/CNRS/IRD) and the Université de Guyane/Géosciences Montpellier, includes Frédéric Quillévéré from the Laboratoire de Géologie de Lyon : Terre, Planètrs, Environnement (LGL-TPE, CNRS/Université Lyon 1/ENS de Lyon/Université Jean Monnet).

Life Sciences - 10.04.2024
Under the watchful eye of scientists, viruses become the muses of therapeutic innovation.
Under the watchful eye of scientists, viruses become the muses of therapeutic innovation.
Work by a consortium of scientists, including a team from the Centre International de Recherche en Infectiologie (CIRI, CNRS/Inserm/ENS de Lyon/Université Lyon 1), describes viruses as modulators of human cell functions. The interaction interfaces of viral proteins with human proteins are used as matrices to design original chemical molecules, offering new perspectives in multiple therapeutic areas.

Health - Pharmacology - 10.04.2024
Respiratory allergies: newly discovered molecule plays a major role in triggering inflammation
Respiratory allergies: newly discovered molecule plays a major role in triggering inflammation
Inflammation plays a major role in allergic diseases, affecting at least 17 million people in France, including 4 million asthmatics. One of the molecules that initiates this process in the respiratory tract has just been identified. This molecule, a member of the alarmin family, is a major therapeutic target for the development of new treatments for respiratory allergies.

Life Sciences - 09.04.2024
Surprising role of female sex pheromone in crop pest: new biocontrol possibilities?
INRAE researchers have discovered that female pheromones play a remarkable role in the African cotton moth. In general, these pheromones trigger mate attraction, promoting encounters between males and females during reproductive periods. Astonishingly, the African cotton moth possesses a pheromonal compound whose modulatory effects exceed those of light itself, a discovery that can inform future biocontrol strategies.

History / Archeology - 05.04.2024
A protohistoric burial site at Marliens (Côte-d'Or)
A protohistoric burial site at Marliens (Côte-d’Or)
Inrap archaeologists conducted an excavation at Marliens, some twenty kilometers east of Dijon, prior to the extension of a gravel pit (Eqiom) in the Ouche valley, a tributary of the Saône. The three excavated areas, representing a total surface area of 60,000 m², yielded a series of occupations ranging from the Neolithic to the Early Iron Age.

Environment - Agronomy / Food Science - 26.03.2024
A global map of how climate change is changing winegrowing regions
INRAE, Bordeaux Sciences Agro, CNRS, Université de Bordeaux and Université de Bourgogne have analysed trends to come in current and developing winegrowing regions around the world to adapt wine production to climate change. The results of the study, published in Nature Reviews Earth and Environment, show that some 90% of coastal and low-altitude regions in southern Europe and California may no longer be able produce good wine in economically sustainable conditions by the end of the century if global warming exceeds +2°C.

Chemistry - Health - 21.03.2024
First Complete Vascularization of Organoids on Microfluidic Chip
First Complete Vascularization of Organoids on Microfluidic Chip
In Vitro System Bypasses -Complex Technical Setups- of Alternative Approaches And Supports Production Scaling e Interdisciplinary Research Institute of Grenoble (IRIG) , CEA-Leti and fellow European and Canadian institutes and researchers have demonstrated the complete vascularization of organoids on a microfluidic chip at speeds and flow rates similar to blood's, improving functional maturation and enabling their long-term survival.