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Earth Sciences - Environment - 04.04.2018
The great acceleration reaches new heights
The great acceleration reaches new heights
An international team of researchers 1 , including a CNRS researcher at the department of Écologie et Dynamique des Systèmes Anthropisés (CNRS / Université de Picardie Jules Verne) has observed an acceleration in the increase of biodiversity on mountain peaks in Europe.

Environment - Life Sciences - 01.02.2018
Press room
Press room
At a global scale, just 12 grape varieties (or 1% of cultivated varieties) occupy up to 80% of vineyards in some countries. Scientists from INRA and Harvard University in the USA have suggested that one of the levers that could be operated to adapt wine-growing to climate change is to exploit the diversity of other cultivated varieties by planting those that are less well known, and thus encouraging winegrowers and consumers to adopt new practices.

Life Sciences - Environment - 25.01.2018
Tara Oceans : discovery of over 100 million genes from the marine world
Tara Oceans : discovery of over 100 million genes from the marine world
The Tara Oceans expedition (2009-2013) has enabled the collection of plankton samples in all of the world's oceans on board the schooner Tara , and the creation of catalogues of species and genes on a scale never before undertaken.

Environment - Civil Engineering - 20.12.2017
Installing rooftop vegetable gardens for sustainable cities
Installing rooftop vegetable gardens for sustainable cities
From producing food to regulating water runoff, urban agriculture has a lot to offer. Scientists from INRA and AgroParisTech have shown that rooftop vegetable gardens are an interesting way to recycle urban waste, produce food, and retain rainwater. Their The challenges of making today's cities more sustainable are legion: waste management, food supplies, sensitivity to heatwaves and the risk of flooding linked notably to the impermeabilisation of soils.

Life Sciences - Environment - 13.10.2017
Gutters teem with inconspicuous life
Gutters teem with inconspicuous life
Scientists from the BOREA Biology of Aquatic Organisms and Ecosystems research unit (CNRS / MNHN / IRD / UPMC / University of Caen / Université des Antilles)—together with a colleague from the Max Planck Institute for Terrestrial Microbiology in Marburg, Germany—have shown that Parisian street gutters are oases of microscopic life, home to microalgae, fungi, sponges, and mollusks.

Health - Environment - 10.10.2017
When anemones bleach, clownfish suffer
When anemones bleach, clownfish suffer
The bleaching of corals is a well-known consequence of climate change.

Environment - Computer Science / Telecom - 31.08.2017
A new mobile application helps scientists map the sound environment
A new mobile application helps scientists map the sound environment
Anyone who owns an Android smartphone will soon be able to contribute to a research project, simply by recording surrounding noise.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 28.08.2017
CO2 and temperature decoupling at the million-year scale during the Cretaceous Greenhouse
CO2 and temperature decoupling at the million-year scale during the Cretaceous Greenhouse
Optical microscopic view of a cuticle of the Frenelopsis fossil conifer used to reconstruct the atmospheric CO2 concentration in the Cretaceous.

Environment - Life Sciences - 03.08.2017
A new threat to pollination : the dark side of artificial light
A new threat to pollination : the dark side of artificial light
A European team, including a researcher from the Centre d'écologie et des Sciences de la Conservation (CNRS/MNHN/UPMC), has shown for the first time the direct and indirect impacts of artificial light on flower pollination. This threat to terrestrial ecosystems comes on top of other threats such as habitat loss, pesticide use, the spread of pathogens, and climate change.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 19.06.2017
Subtropical climate conditions and mangrove growth in Arctic Siberia during the early Eocene
Subtropical climate conditions and mangrove growth in Arctic Siberia during the early Eocene
Abstract The early Eocene (ca. 56'47.8 Ma) was an interval of exceptional warmth with reduced pole-to-equator temperature gradients. Climate proxies indicate mean annual air temperatures (MATs) and sea-surface temperatures (SSTs) exceeding 8'18 °C and frost-free, mild winters in polar areas, features that have proven difficult to reproduce with the most elaborate climate models.

Environment - Life Sciences - 01.06.2017
Calcium Isotopic Evidence for Vulnerable Marine Ecosystem Structure Prior to the K/Pg Extinction
Calcium Isotopic Evidence for Vulnerable Marine Ecosystem Structure Prior to the K/Pg Extinction
Artwork showing cretaceous marine predators. Left to right is a non-descript invertebrate pursued by a 4 foot (1.2 metres) long Enchodus, followed by a 17 foot (5 metres) long Dolichorhynchops, followed by a 55 foot (17 metres) long Mosasaur. ©Walter MYERS/SPL/COSMOS Abstract The collapse of marine ecosystems during the end-Cretaceous mass extinction involved the base of the food chain up to ubiquitous vertebrate apex predators.

Environment - Life Sciences - 08.05.2017
Does global warming threaten the gut microbiota?
Does global warming threaten the gut microbiota?
The deleterious effects of climate change on bacterial species composing the gut microbiota 1 of a lizard have been demonstrated by researchers from the Evolution and Biological Diversity laboratory in Toulouse (CNRS / Université Toulouse III—Paul Sabatier / ENSFEA / IRD), the Theoretical and Experimental Ecology Station (CNRS / Université Toulouse III—Paul Sabatier), and the University of Exeter in Great Britain 2 .

Environment - History / Archeology - 03.03.2017
Ancient peoples shaped the Amazon rainforest
Ancient peoples shaped the Amazon rainforest
An international team of ecologists and social scientists, including french researchers from IRD, Cirad and Inra, has shown in a new study published on 3 March 2017 in the journal Science that tree species domesticated and distributed throughout the Amazon basin by indigenous peoples before 1492 continue to play an important role in modern-day forests.

Life Sciences - Environment - 24.02.2017
Where do flowers come from? Shedding light on Darwin's ‘abominable mystery'
Where do flowers come from? Shedding light on Darwin’s ‘abominable mystery’
The mystery that is the origin of flowering plants has been partially solved thanks to a team from the Laboratoire de Physiologie Cellulaire et Végétale (CNRS/Inra/CEA/Université Grenoble Alpes), in

Environment - 15.02.2017
Alien species on the rise worldwide
Alien species on the rise worldwide
The increase in numbers of alien species does not show any sign of saturation at a global level, an international team of 45 researchers led by scientists from Senckenberg, Germany, and University of Vienna, Austria, has discovered. They found that during the last centuries the number of new introductions has continuously increased worldwide, with more than a third of all first introductions recorded between 1970 and 2014.

Environment - 15.02.2017
Risk of rapid North Atlantic cooling in 21st century greater than previously estimated
Risk of rapid North Atlantic cooling in 21st century greater than previously estimated
The possibility of major climate change in the Atlantic region has long been recognized and has even been the subject of a Hollywood movie: The Day After Tomorrow .

Environment - 14.02.2017
Biodiversity when restoring soil through fallowing: stronger interactions among organisms, increased carbon uptake in soil
Biodiversity when restoring soil through fallowing: stronger interactions among organisms, increased carbon uptake in soil
As a part of the EU's EcoFINDERS project, led by INRA, researchers studied changes in soil biodiversity when using fallowing as a restoration strategy. The study was made possible through the creation of a unique, long-term observation facility. It is also notable for the very large range of soil organisms (microand macroorganisms) studied by the project's researchers, who analysed their diversity and their community interactions.

Environment - Agronomy / Food Science - 10.02.2017
Win-win strategies for climate and food security
Win-win strategies for climate and food security
Efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from the agriculture and forestry sectors could lead to increased food prices-but new research identifies strategies that could help mitigate climate change while avoiding steep hikes in food prices. Climate policies that target agriculture and forests could lead to increased food prices, but reducing deforestation and increasing soil carbon sequestration in agriculture could significantly reduce greenhouse gas emissions while avoiding risk to food security, according to new research published in the journal Environmental Research Letters .

Health - Environment - 26.12.2016
Divide and rule, or how plant diversity increases the sustainability of their resistance
Divide and rule, or how plant diversity increases the sustainability of their resistance
In the Yuanyang region of China where rice cultivation is a tradition, scientists from INRA and CIRAD, working in collaboration with a Chinese team, have focused on the defence mechanisms of rice against its pathogenic agents.

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