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Environment - Life Sciences - 06.05.2021
In the Alps, climate change affects biodiversity
In the Alps, climate change affects biodiversity
The European Alps is certainly one of the most scrutinized mountain range in the world, as it forms a true open-air laboratory showing how climate change affects biodiversity. Although many studies have independently demonstrated the impact of climate change in the Alps on either the seasonal activity (i.e.

Health - Life Sciences - 13.04.2021
'All-in-One' Technique that Could Accelerate Phage-Therapy Diagnosis
’All-in-One’ Technique that Could Accelerate Phage-Therapy Diagnosis
Lensless Imaging System Affirms Phage Therapy's Value in Treating Serious Infection, Tracks Phage Resistance and Could Easily Be Implemented in Compact Devices at Phage Labs GRENOBLE, France - April 13, 2021 - A team of French and Swiss scientists has demonstrated a lensless imaging technique that could easily be implemented in cost-effective and compact devices in phage laboratories to accelerate phage-therapy diagnosis.

Life Sciences - Health - 06.04.2021
A protein with a dual role: both repair and mutation
A protein with a dual role: both repair and mutation
The Mfd protein repairs bacterial DNA, but can also, to scientists' surprise, promote mutation. Bacterial mutations can lead to antibiotic resistance. Understanding this second "role" of the Mfd protein opens up opportunities for combating antibiotic resistance, and also the resistance of tumours to anti-cancer drugs and therapies.

Life Sciences - 31.03.2021
A brain signature that predicts vulnerability to addiction
A team of neurobiologists at the Institut de Neurosciences de la Timone (CNRS/Aix-Marseille Université) has just shown that within a population of rats it can predict which will become cocaine addicts. One of the criteria for addiction in rats is the compulsive search for a drug despite its negative consequences.

Health - Life Sciences - 18.03.2021
Targeting Cancer Detection & Identification of Microorganisms, CEA-Leti Develops Mid-Infrared, Spectral-Imaging Technique
Targeting Cancer Detection & Identification of Microorganisms, CEA-Leti Develops Mid-Infrared, Spectral-Imaging Technique
Presentations at Photonics West 2021 Show How Early-Stage Imaging System's Flexibility Can Be Applied Broadly in Medical Field GRENOBLE, France - March 18, 2021 - CEA-Leti scientists have developed a lensless, infrared spectral-imaging system for medical diagnostics. The first application is cancer detection in the tissue section and the second is the identification and discrimination of microorganisms, such as bacteria.

Paleontology - Life Sciences - 18.03.2021
Discovery of a 'winged' shark in the Cretaceous seas
Discovery of a ’winged’ shark in the Cretaceous seas
The fossil of an unusual shark specimen reminiscent of manta rays sheds light on morphological diversity in Cretaceous sharks. This plankton feeder was discovered in Mexico and analysed by an international team of palaeontologists led by a CNRS researcher from Géosciences Rennes 1 (CNRS/University of Rennes 1).

Life Sciences - 29.12.2020
A single gene 'invented' haemoglobin several times
A single gene ’invented’ haemoglobin several times
Thanks to the marine worm Platynereis dumerilii , an animal whose genes have evolved very slowly, scientists from CNRS, Université de Paris and Sorbonne Université, in association with others at the University of Saint Petersburg and the University of Rio de Janeiro, have shown that while haemoglobin appeared independently in several species, it actually descends from a single gene transmitted to all by their last common ancestor.

Life Sciences - 29.12.2020
A single gene 'invented' haemoglobin several times
A single gene ’invented’ haemoglobin several times
Thanks to the marine worm Platynereis dumerilii , an animal whose genes have evolved very slowly, scientists from CNRS, Université de Paris and Sorbonne Université, in association with others at the University of Saint Petersburg and the University of Rio de Janeiro, have shown that while haemoglobin appeared independently in several species, it actually descends from a single gene transmitted to all by their last common ancestor.

Health - Life Sciences - 16.12.2020
Alzheimer’s Disease: Regulating Copper in the Brain Stops Memory Loss Among Mice
Alzheimer's disease is characterized by the presence of amyloid plaques 1 in the patient's brain. These plaques sequester copper, and contain approximately five times as much as a healthy brain. Two CNRS scientists from the Coordination Chemistry Laboratory recently developed, with their colleagues from the Guangdong University of Technology and Shenzhen University (China), a molecule that regulates the circulation of copper in the brain.

Health - Life Sciences - 19.11.2020
Greater mosquito susceptibility to Zika virus fueled the epidemic
Greater mosquito susceptibility to Zika virus fueled the epidemic
The Zika virus has spread around the world over the last decade, causing millions of infections, some of which have been associated with congenital abnormalities and neurological disorders. Scientists from the CNRS, the Institut Pasteur, and the IRD 1 turned their attention to the main vector of the virus, the mosquito Aedes aegypti .

Life Sciences - 03.08.2020
Iron-mediated cancer cell activity: a new regulation mechanism
Iron-mediated cancer cell activity: a new regulation mechanism
Researchers at the Institut Curie have recently shown that cancer cells use a membrane protein that has been known for several decades to internalise iron. Published (August 3rd, 2020), this work shows that the absorbed iron allows cancer cells to acquire metastatic properties. Biologists knew CD44 well, but didn't know the major biological function that it fulfils.

Life Sciences - 15.07.2020
How flies flip around on take-off from an upside- down position
How flies flip around on take-off from an upside- down position
Flies are able to right themselves very quickly when taking off from an upside-down position. Scientists from the CNRS and from The Institute of Movement Science (ISM) at Aix-Marseille Université studying this phenomenon discovered the surprising way these insects begin by turning their bodies before their heads on take-off.

Life Sciences - 25.05.2020
7,000 years of demographic history in France
7,000 years of demographic history in France
A team led by scientists from the Institut Jacques Monod (CNRS/Université de Paris) 1 have shown that French prehistory was punctuated by two waves of migration: the first during the Neolithic period, about 6,300 years ago, the second during the Bronze Age, about 4,200 years ago.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 22.05.2020
Cell reproduction dogma challenged
Cell reproduction dogma challenged
Meiosis is essential to sexual reproduction. For almost 15 years, it has been commonly held that retinoic acid, a molecule derived from vitamin A, triggers meiosis in mammalian germ cells. Yet, in joint articles published in Science Advances ( 22 May 2020 ), researchers from the Institut de Biologie Valrose (CNRS / INSERM / Université Côte d'Azur) and the IGBMC (CNRS / INSERM / University of Strasbourg), with their colleagues, demonstrate that meiosis in mice begins and proceeds normally even in the absence of retinoic acid.

Life Sciences - 14.05.2020
The dreaming brain tunes out the outside world
The dreaming brain tunes out the outside world
Scientists from the CNRS and the ENS-PSL in France 1 and Monash University in Australia have shown that the brain suppresses information from the outside world, such as the sound of a conversation, during the sleep phase linked to dreaming. This ability be one of the protective mechanisms of dreams.

Life Sciences - 09.04.2020
Risk aversion as a survival strategy in ants
Risk aversion as a survival strategy in ants
Ants are excellent navigators and always find their way back to the nest. But how do they react when an obstacle or a predator blocks their path? An international team including Antoine Wystrach, a CNRS researcher at the Research Centre on Animal Cognition (CNRS/Université Tou-louse III - Paul Sabatier), has shown that ants are capable of changing their familiar route to avoid traps thanks to an aversive learning mechanism: by associating visual cues with negative experiences, they can memorise potentially dangerous routes.

Life Sciences - 23.03.2020
"Thermometer" protein regulates blooming
As average temperatures rise every year, it is no longer rare to see plants flower as early as February. Behind this phenomenon is a complex of proteins whose activity is controlled by temperature changes, as has just been demonstrated by researchers from the Cell and Plant Physiology Laboratory (CNRS / CEA / INRAE / Université Grenoble Alpes) and their partners.

Life Sciences - 05.03.2020
Triglycerides control neurons in the reward circuit
Triglycerides control neurons in the reward circuit
Energy-dense food, obesity and compulsive food intake bordering addiction: the scientific literature has been pointing to connections between these for years. Scientists at the CNRS and Université de Paris have just shown for the first time how fatty nutrients act on the brain in the reward circuit. Published in Cell Metabolism on 5 March 2020, these results shed new light on the connection between food and eating disorders.

Life Sciences - 04.03.2020
Wild boars provide archaeologists with clues to early domestication
Wild boars provide archaeologists with clues to early domestication
Until now, archaeozoologists have been unable to reconstruct the earliest stages of domestication: the process of placing wild animals in captivity remained beyond their methodological reach 1 . Using the wild boar as an experimental model, a multidisciplinary team made up of scientists from the CNRS and the French National Museum of Natural History 2 have shown that a life spent in captivity has an identifiable effect on the shape of the calcaneus, a tarsal bone that plays a propulsive role in locomotion.

Health - Life Sciences - 03.03.2020
Alzheimer's: Can an amino acid help to restore memories?
Alzheimer’s: Can an amino acid help to restore memories?
Scientists at the Laboratoire des Maladies Neurodégénératives (CNRS/CEA/Université Paris-Saclay) and the Neurocentre Magendie (INSERM/Université de Bordeaux) have just shown that a metabolic pathway plays a determining role in Alzheimer's disease's memory problems. This work, published on 3 March 2020 in Cell Metabolism, also shows that supplying a specific amino acid as a nutritional supplement in a mouse model of Alzheimer's restores spatial memory affected early.
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