Preventive locust management: humanitarian crises averted

Environment - May 17
Environment

A new study, published by scientists from CIRAD and INRAE, provides a state-of-the-art assessment of the risk of Desert Locust invasions in West and North Africa, by analyzing 40 years of field data and climate records. The study reveals that preventive management measures have been successful in countering the favorable effects of climate change on outbreaks of the pest. This finding underlines the crucial importance of preventive management in mitigating the impacts of climate change and its consequences for food security in the region

Health - May 13

Breast cancer: a study evaluates the time it takes to return to work

Health

After how long do women treated for breast cancer return to work? Until now, there has been little national data on this important aspect of the patient's care.

Environment - May 9

Marine Protected Areas: only a third are effective

Environment

Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) are designed to ensure the long-term conservation of marine ecosystems and the services they provide to human societies;

Health - May 13

Cancer spread: targeting platelets to counter metastasis?

Scanning electron microscopy. Here we see how platelets (in blue/purple) attach to two tumour cells (in red) in a pre-clinical mouse model.

Vulnerability of the placenta to air pollution: what effects on the unborn child’s development?

How does exposure to air pollution affect the proper course of pregnancy and the development of the unborn child' A research team from Inserm and Université Grenoble Alpes investigated the potential effects on placental DNA of exposure to three major airborne pollutants.

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Environment - Agronomy / Food Science - 17.05.2024
Preventive locust management: humanitarian crises averted
A new study, published by scientists from CIRAD and INRAE, provides a state-of-the-art assessment of the risk of Desert Locust invasions in West and North Africa, by analyzing 40 years of field data and climate records. The study reveals that preventive management measures have been successful in countering the favorable effects of climate change on outbreaks of the pest.

Health - 13.05.2024
Breast cancer: a study evaluates the time it takes to return to work
Breast cancer: a study evaluates the time it takes to return to work
After how long do women treated for breast cancer return to work? Until now, there has been little national data on this important aspect of the patient's care. A study carried out by researchers at Claude Bernard Lyon 1 University, Inserm, Gustave Eiffel University and Hospices civils de Lyon, based on data from the Assurance Maladie, has quantified this phenomenon, shedding light on the diversity of situations experienced by these women.

Health - Pharmacology - 13.05.2024
Cancer spread: targeting platelets to counter metastasis?
Scanning electron microscopy. Here we see how platelets (in blue/purple) attach to two tumour cells (in red) in a pre-clinical mouse model. Maria Jesus Garcia Leon (unit 1109 Inserm/Université de Strasbourg) What if our blood platelets , which play a major role in maintaining the integrity of our circulatory system, were not always on our side' Research teams from Inserm, Université de Strasbourg and the French Blood Establishment have studied their role in the process of metastasis formation.

Environment - 09.05.2024
Marine Protected Areas: only a third are effective
Marine Protected Areas: only a third are effective
Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) are designed to ensure the long-term conservation of marine ecosystems and the services they provide to human societies; however, only a third of these areas are capable of offering real protection on a global scale. These are the findings of a study, carried out by scientists from the CNRS 1 as part of an international research team, to be published on 9 May in Conservation Letters .

Life Sciences - Health - 07.05.2024
Vulnerability of the placenta to air pollution: what effects on the unborn child’s development?
How does exposure to air pollution affect the proper course of pregnancy and the development of the unborn child' A research team from Inserm and Université Grenoble Alpes investigated the potential effects on placental DNA of exposure to three major airborne pollutants. When comparing the data obtained from around 1 500 pregnant women, it observed that exposure to these pollutants during pregnancy was associated with epigenetic changes liable to alter the development of the foetus, particularly at the metabolic, immune and neurological levels.

Health - Life Sciences - 07.05.2024
Placental vulnerability to air pollution: what effects on the development of the unborn child?
Placental vulnerability to air pollution: what effects on the development of the unborn child?
How does exposure to air pollution during pregnancy affect the pregnancy and the development of the unborn child? A research team from Inserm and Grenoble Alpes University has investigated how placental DNA is modified by exposure to three major air pollutants. By comparing data obtained from almost 1,500 pregnant women, they were able to observe that exposure to these pollutants during pregnancy was associated with epigenetic modifications likely to alter fetal development, particularly at the metabolic, immune and neurological levels.

Health - Life Sciences - 06.05.2024
Discovery of a mechanism that allows Staphylococcus aureus to survive in blood
Staphylococcus aureus (golden staph) is one of the main causes of bacterial infection in France and throughout the world and is particularly responsible for nosocomial infections. Researchers from INRAE, the CEA and CNRS have discovered how this bacterium can survive in the hostile environment of blood.

Health - Agronomy / Food Science - 02.05.2024
Bird flu control for pandemic prevention must start before poultry reach wet markets
Bird flu control for pandemic prevention must start before poultry reach wet markets, new research finds Research published today reveals the speed at which avian influenza ('bird flu') can spread in Asia's live bird markets and the urgent need to pivot pandemic prevention strategies. The paper, from senior scientists in the GCRF One Health Poultry Hub, describes how a computer model of avian influenza virus transmission was for the first time input with biological data obtained from chickens in live bird markets (also known as wet markets).

Health - Environment - 02.05.2024
Modeling avian influenza in Asian poultry markets
A new study involving INRAE reveals the speed at which bird flu is spreading in live poultry markets in Asia. Scientists from the One Health Poultry Hub program have modeled the spread of avian flu in these markets, integrating for the first time biological data collected in the field. They focused their study on the H9N2 avian flu virus, which is not very virulent for poultry, but represents a major risk in the spread and evolution of the disease.

Life Sciences - 01.05.2024
Cell contraction drive the initial shaping of human embryos
Cell contraction drive the initial shaping of human embryos
Human embryo compaction, an essential step in the first days of an embryo's development, is driven by the contractility of its cells. This is the finding of a team of scientists from CNRS, Institut Curie, Inserm, AP-HP and the Collège de France. Published in the 1 May edition of Nature, these results contradict the presupposed driving role of cell adhesion in this phenomenon and pave the way for improved assisted reproductive technology (ART) .

Life Sciences - 01.05.2024
Cell contraction drive the initial shaping of human embryos
Human embryo compaction, an essential step in the first days of an embryo's development, is driven by the contractility of its cells. This is the finding of a team of scientists from CNRS, Institut Curie, Inserm, AP-HP and the Collège de France. Published in the 1 May edition of Nature, these results contradict the presupposed driving role of cell adhesion in this phenomenon and pave the way for improved assisted reproductive technology (ART) .

History / Archeology - 24.04.2024
Social change may explain decline in genetic diversity of the Y chromosome at the end of the Neolithic period
Social change may explain decline in genetic diversity of the Y chromosome at the end of the Neolithic period
The emergence in the Neolithic of patrilineal 1 social systems, in which children are affiliated with their father's lineage, may explain a spectacular decline in the genetic diversity of the Y chromosome 2 observed worldwide between 3,000 and 5,000 years ago. In a study to be published on 24 April in Nature Communications, a team of scientists from the CNRS, MNHN and Université Paris Cité 3 suggest that these patrilineal organisations had a greater impact on the Y chromosome than mortality during conflict.

Astronomy / Space - Physics - 24.04.2024
Gaia BH3, the black hole that shouldn’t exist
The recent discovery of a binary system containing an extremely rare object, the most massive black hole (apart from SgrA*) ever detected in our Galaxy, calls into question the models for the formation of these bodies. Up until now, the Gaia space observatory has been used to observe the position and motion of stars, uncover the underlying structures of our Galaxy, and find new exoplanets.

Life Sciences - Health - 24.04.2024
Discovering cancers of epigenetic origin without DNA mutation
Discovering cancers of epigenetic origin without DNA mutation
A research team including scientists from the CNRS 1 has discovered that cancer, one of the leading causes of death worldwide, can be caused entirely by epigenetic changes 2 , in other words, changes that contribute to how gene expression is regulated, and partly explain why, despite an identical genome, an individual develops very different cells (neurons, skin cells, etc.

Health - Agronomy / Food Science - 24.04.2024
The consumption of certain food additive emulsifiers could be associated with the risk of developing type 2 diabetes
The consumption of certain food additive emulsifiers could be associated with the risk of developing type 2 diabetes
Emulsifiers are among the additives most widely used by the food industry, helping to improve the texture of food products and extend their shelf life. Researchers from Inserm, INRAE, Université Sorbonne Paris Nord, Université Paris Cité and Cnam, as part of the Nutritional Epidemiology Research Team (CRESS-EREN), studied the possible links between the dietary intake of food additive emulsifiers and the onset of type 2 diabetes between 2009 and 2023.

Environment - Agronomy / Food Science - 23.04.2024
Emotion can also cause chickens to get red in the face
How can we know what chickens are feeling? An INRAE research team were able to uncover various degrees of redness on chickens' faces depending on their emotional state, while, at the same time, demonstrating that the skin of chickens that were used to humans stayed lighter in colour, thereby indicating a calmer state when humans were nearby.

Health - Agronomy / Food Science - 23.04.2024
The consumption of certain food additive emulsifiers could be associated with the risk of developing type 2 diabetes
Emulsifiers are among the additives most widely used by the food industry, helping to improve the texture of food products and extend their shelf life. Researchers from Inserm, INRAE, Université Sorbonne Paris Nord, Université Paris Cité and Cnam, as part of the Nutritional Epidemiology Research Team (CRESS-EREN), studied the possible links between the dietary intake of food additive emulsifiers and the onset of type 2 diabetes between 2009 and 2023.

Health - Agronomy / Food Science - 18.04.2024
Displaying the Nutri-Score in advertisements would lead to healthier food choices
Displaying the Nutri-Score in advertisements would lead to healthier food choices
For the first time, a study by a multi-disciplinary team of researchers from Aix-Marseille Université and Sorbonne Paris Nord University, including specialists in the fields of communication, nutrition, epidemiology and public health, has shown that displaying the Nutri-Score on food products in advertisements would lead consumers to choose healthier foods.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 18.04.2024
The Earth, precariously balanced
Aerial view of slash-and-burn agriculture in the state of Amazonas, western Brazil (September 2022). On our planet, everything is interconnected, from terrestrial and marine ecosystems and biodiversity to ice sheets, rivers and oceans. But a recent report reveals that the dynamics of these different systems is being destabilised by human activities to such an extent that they are reaching points of no return.

Life Sciences - 18.04.2024
Axons follow a signposted path to reach their muscular target
Publication of the IGFL in the journal PNAS on March 19, 2024. News by CNRS Biology on April 12, 2024. During embryonic development, motor neurons, located in the spinal cord, emit extensions - the axons - which must find their way to their targets - the muscle cells. These motoneurons, last link between electrical and mechanical signals in the locomotor system, trigger movement via their axons.
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