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Environment - May 6
Environment
The European Alps is certainly one of the most scrutinized mountain range in the world, as it forms a true open-air laboratory showing how climate change affects biodiversity. Although many studies have independently demonstrated the impact of climate change in the Alps on either the seasonal activity (i.e.
Materials Science - May 5
Materials Science

The discovery of the earliest human burial site yet found in Africa, by an international team including several CNRS researchers 1 , has just been announced in the journal Nature .

Environment - Apr 26
Environment

The Chauvet Cave, which lies by the entrance to the Gorges of the Ardèche, is home to the world's oldest cave paintings, dating back 36,000 years.

Chemistry - Apr 27

Publication of CRMN in the journal PNAS on January 5, 2021. Neurodegenerative disorders are frequently associated with -sheet-rich amyloid deposits. Amyloid-forming proteins can aggregate under different structural conformations known as strains, which can exhibit a prion-like behavior and distinct pathophenotypes.

Art and Design - Apr 15
Art and Design

" It is machination, it is deception ," said the Director General of the Berlin Royal Museums in his defence when criticized for buying a fake.


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Environment - Life Sciences - 06.05.2021
In the Alps, climate change affects biodiversity
In the Alps, climate change affects biodiversity
The European Alps is certainly one of the most scrutinized mountain range in the world, as it forms a true open-air laboratory showing how climate change affects biodiversity. Although many studies have independently demonstrated the impact of climate change in the Alps on either the seasonal activity (i.e.

Materials Science - 05.05.2021
Africa's oldest human burial site uncovered
Africa’s oldest human burial site uncovered
The discovery of the earliest human burial site yet found in Africa, by an international team including several CNRS researchers 1 , has just been announced in the journal Nature . At Panga ya Saidi, in Kenya, north of Mombasa, the body of a three-year-old, dubbed Mtoto (Swahili for 'child') by the researchers, was deposited and buried in an excavated pit approximately 78,000 years ago.

Chemistry - 27.04.2021
Structural and molecular basis of cross-seeding barriers in amyloids
Publication of CRMN in the journal PNAS on January 5, 2021. Neurodegenerative disorders are frequently associated with -sheet-rich amyloid deposits. Amyloid-forming proteins can aggregate under different structural conformations known as strains, which can exhibit a prion-like behavior and distinct pathophenotypes.

Environment - 26.04.2021
When Chauvet Cave artists created its artwork, the Pont d'Arc was already there
When Chauvet Cave artists created its artwork, the Pont d’Arc was already there
The Chauvet Cave, which lies by the entrance to the Gorges of the Ardèche, is home to the world's oldest cave paintings, dating back 36,000 years. Their state of preservation and aesthetic qualities earned them a spot on the World Heritage List in 2014, 20 years after their discovery. The location of the cavern-surrounded by a remarkable landscape, next to the Pont d'Arc natural archway-raises the question of whether the people who executed these artworks looked and walked out upon the same landscape as today.

Art and Design - 15.04.2021
Leonardo da Vinci definitely did not sculpt the Flora bust
Leonardo da Vinci definitely did not sculpt the Flora bust
" It is machination, it is deception ," said the Director General of the Berlin Royal Museums in his defence when criticized for buying a fake. Wilhelm Bode did not budge an inch: the sculpture he acquired in 1909 was an as yet unknown production of the great Renaissance master, Leonardo da Vinci. After one hundred years and numerous controversies, a group of scientists led by a CNRS researcher 1 has just proven him wrong once and for all.

Health - Life Sciences - 13.04.2021
'All-in-One' Technique that Could Accelerate Phage-Therapy Diagnosis
’All-in-One’ Technique that Could Accelerate Phage-Therapy Diagnosis
Lensless Imaging System Affirms Phage Therapy's Value in Treating Serious Infection, Tracks Phage Resistance and Could Easily Be Implemented in Compact Devices at Phage Labs GRENOBLE, France - April 13, 2021 - A team of French and Swiss scientists has demonstrated a lensless imaging technique that could easily be implemented in cost-effective and compact devices in phage laboratories to accelerate phage-therapy diagnosis.

Astronomy / Space Science - Environment - 08.04.2021
More than 5,000 tons of extraterrestrial dust fall to Earth each year
More than 5,000 tons of extraterrestrial dust fall to Earth each year
Every year, our planet encounters dust from comets 1 and asteroid 2 . These interplanetary dust particles pass through our atmosphere and give rise to shooting stars. Some of them reach the ground in the form of micrometeorites. An international program 3 conducted for nearly 20 years by scientists from the CNRS, the Université Paris-Saclay and the National museum of natural history 4 with the support of the French polar institute, has determined that 5,200 tons per year of these micrometeorites reach the ground.

Physics - 07.04.2021
Particle physics: will muons lead us towards a new physics?
Particle physics: will muons lead us towards a new physics?
Muons, particles akin to electrons, have kept physicists' heads spinning for more than a decade, because an experimental measurement of their magnetic properties 1 disagrees from theory. Could this be caused by unknown particles or forces? A new theoretical calculation of this parameter, involving CNRS physicists and published , has reduced the discrepancy with the experimental measurement.

Life Sciences - Health - 06.04.2021
A protein with a dual role: both repair and mutation
A protein with a dual role: both repair and mutation
The Mfd protein repairs bacterial DNA, but can also, to scientists' surprise, promote mutation. Bacterial mutations can lead to antibiotic resistance. Understanding this second "role" of the Mfd protein opens up opportunities for combating antibiotic resistance, and also the resistance of tumours to anti-cancer drugs and therapies.

Life Sciences - 31.03.2021
A brain signature that predicts vulnerability to addiction
A team of neurobiologists at the Institut de Neurosciences de la Timone (CNRS/Aix-Marseille Université) has just shown that within a population of rats it can predict which will become cocaine addicts. One of the criteria for addiction in rats is the compulsive search for a drug despite its negative consequences.

Environment - Economics / Business - 31.03.2021
How much are invasive species costing us?
How much are invasive species costing us?
Scientists from the CNRS, the IRD, and the Muséum National d'Histoire Naturelle have just released the most comprehensive estimate to date of the financial toll of invasive species: nearly $1.3 trillion over four decades. Published in Nature (31 March 2021), their findings are based on the InvaCost database, which is financed by the BNP Paribas Foundation and the Paris-Saclay University Foundation's AXA Chair of Invasion Biology.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 24.03.2021
Astronomers Image Magnetic Fields at the Edge of M87's Black Hole
Astronomers Image Magnetic Fields at the Edge of M87’s Black Hole
Within the EHT collaboration, the CNRS and IRAM participated in the creation of a new image of the black hole in the M87 galaxy. Produced in so-called "polarized" light, this image makes it possible to observe the magnetic field and to better understand the physics around black holes. The Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) collaboration, who produced the first ever image of a black hole , has revealed today a new view of the massive object at the centre of the M87 galaxy: how it looks in polarised light.

Environment - 24.03.2021
Climate change has reduced ocean mixing far more than expected
Climate change has reduced ocean mixing far more than expected
The ocean is dynamic in nature, playing a crucial role as a planetary thermostat that buffer global warming. However, in response to climate change, the ocean has generally become stabler over the past 50 years. Six times stabler, in fact, than previously estimated-as shown by a new study that researchers from the CNRS, Sorbonne University, and IFREMER have conducted within the scope of an international collaboration.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 18.03.2021
First images of the cosmic web reveal a myriad of unsuspected dwarf galaxies
First images of the cosmic web reveal a myriad of unsuspected dwarf galaxies
The MUSE instrument on the Very Large Telescope has captured an image of several filaments in the early Universe... ... revealing the unexpected presence of billions of dwarf galaxies in the filaments Although the filaments of gas in which galaxies are born have long been predicted by cosmological models, we have so far had no real images of such objects.

Health - Life Sciences - 18.03.2021
Targeting Cancer Detection & Identification of Microorganisms, CEA-Leti Develops Mid-Infrared, Spectral-Imaging Technique
Targeting Cancer Detection & Identification of Microorganisms, CEA-Leti Develops Mid-Infrared, Spectral-Imaging Technique
Presentations at Photonics West 2021 Show How Early-Stage Imaging System's Flexibility Can Be Applied Broadly in Medical Field GRENOBLE, France - March 18, 2021 - CEA-Leti scientists have developed a lensless, infrared spectral-imaging system for medical diagnostics. The first application is cancer detection in the tissue section and the second is the identification and discrimination of microorganisms, such as bacteria.

Paleontology - Life Sciences - 18.03.2021
Discovery of a 'winged' shark in the Cretaceous seas
Discovery of a ’winged’ shark in the Cretaceous seas
The fossil of an unusual shark specimen reminiscent of manta rays sheds light on morphological diversity in Cretaceous sharks. This plankton feeder was discovered in Mexico and analysed by an international team of palaeontologists led by a CNRS researcher from Géosciences Rennes 1 (CNRS/University of Rennes 1).

Physics - 11.03.2021
CEA-Leti Previews the Future of Retinal Projection In Four Papers at Photonics West 2021
CEA-Leti Previews the Future of Retinal Projection In Four Papers at Photonics West 2021
From Microscopic Holograms to New Optical Concepts and Design, the Institute Unveils Key Results Towards Integrated Retinal-Projection Displays -GRENOBLE, France - March 11, 2021 - Expanding on its previous advances in integrated optics and silicon photonics, CEA-Leti presented four related papers at Photonics West 2021 Digital Forum that show key steps toward improved AR capabilities with retinal projection.

Health - Mathematics - 04.03.2021
COVID-19 Screening: A New Model for Assessing the Efficiency of Group Testing
COVID-19 Screening: A New Model for Assessing the Efficiency of Group Testing
How best to evaluate the performance of a group testing strategy for the SARS-CoV-2 virus, which involves pooling samples from multiple individuals in order to conduct a single RT-PCR test on the whole group? To do precisely that, scientists from the CNRS, l'université Grenoble Alpes, and l'université Sorbonne Paris Nord 1 have developed a model that evaluates the efficiency of such tests.

Environment - 02.03.2021
Ecology: The Scientific Literature Dominated by Men and a Handful of Countries
Publishing in peer-reviewed scientific journals is crucial for the development of a researcher's career. The scientists that publish the most often in the most prestigious journals generally acquire greater renown, as well as higher responsibilities. However, a team involving two CNRS researchers 1 has just shown that the vast majority of scientific articles in the fields of ecology and conservation biology are authored by men working in a few Western countries.

Architecture - 22.02.2021
CEA-Leti & Dolphin Design Report FD-SOI Breakthrough that Boosts Operating Frequency by 450% and Reduces Power Consumption by 30%
CEA-Leti & Dolphin Design Report FD-SOI Breakthrough that Boosts Operating Frequency by 450% and Reduces Power Consumption by 30%
J oin t Paper Presented at ISSCC 2021 Shows How New Adaptive Back-Biasing Technique O vercomes Integration Limits in Chip Design Flows CEA-Leti & Dolphin Design Report FD-SOI Breakthrough that Boosts Operating Frequency by 450% and Reduces Power Consumption by 30% GRENOBLE, France - Feb. 22, 2021 - CEA-Leti and Dolphin Design have developed an adaptive back-biasing (ABB) architecture for FD-SOI chips that can be seamlessly integrated in the digital design flow with industrial-grade qualification, overcoming integration drawbacks of existing ABB techniques.
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