news 2016


Category


Years
2020 | 2019 | 2018 | 2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013


Results 81 - 100 of 131.


Mathematics - 15.06.2016
Subduction controls the distribution and fragmentation of Earth's tectonic plates
Subduction controls the distribution and fragmentation of Earth’s tectonic plates
Numerical simulation of the movement of the mantle and the surface of a virtual Earth. The boundaries of the calculated surface plates are white.

Environment - 14.06.2016
CO2 hits record highs in the Southern hemisphere
CO2 hits record highs in the Southern hemisphere
Last month, the atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide (CO2) as measured at Amsterdam Island, in the southern Indian Ocean, for the first time exceeded the symbolic value of 400 ppm 1 , or 0.04%.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 07.06.2016
LISA Pathfinder exceeds expectations
LISA Pathfinder exceeds expectations
Mission accomplished for the LISA Pathfinder spacecraft after only two months of science operations. Not only were the technologies needed for the future eLISA 1 gravitational wave space observatory validated, but the performance of the ESA demonstrator also exceeded the project specifications by a factor of five, and was very close to requirements for eLISA .

Life Sciences - History / Archeology - 02.06.2016
Dogs were domesticated not once, but twice... in different parts of the world
Dogs were domesticated not once, but twice... in different parts of the world
The question, ‘Where do domestic dogs come from'', has vexed scholars for a very long time. Some argue that humans first domesticated wolves in Europe, while others claim this happened in Central Asia or China. A new paper suggests that all these claims may be right.

Health - 26.05.2016
Targeting metals to fight Staphylococcus aureus
Researchers from CEA, CNRS, Aix-Marseille Université and INRA, in France have discovered a unique system of acquisition of essential metals in the pathogenic bacterium Staphylococcus aureus.

Environment - History / Archeology - 25.05.2016
French cave sheds new light on the Neanderthals
French cave sheds new light on the Neanderthals
Deep inside Bruniquel Cave, in the Tarn et Garonne region of southwestern France, a set of man-made structures 1 336 meters from the entrance was recently dated as being approximately 176,500 years old.

Mathematics - Chemistry - 23.05.2016
Ocean pollution: focusing on the fragmentation of plastic waste
Ocean pollution: focusing on the fragmentation of plastic waste
First discovered by sailors, the masses of plastic debris floating at the center of vast ocean vortices called gyres are today under close scrutiny by scientists. To better understand the fragmentation of microplastics under the effect of light and abrasion by waves, researchers combined physico-chemical analyses with statistical modeling.

History / Archeology - Earth Sciences - 20.05.2016
Lead pollution reveals the ancient history of Naples
Lead pollution reveals the ancient history of Naples
View of the eruption of Vesuvius in 79 AD, from the bay of Naples, as imagined by the artist William Turner between 1817 and 1820 . Yale Center for British Art, Collection Paul Mellon. Almost two thousand years after the eruption of Vesuvius that destroyed Pompeii and Herculaneum, certain periods of the history of Naples have just been reconstructed.

Earth Sciences - History / Archeology - 16.05.2016
Lead pollution reveals the ancient history of Naples
Lead pollution reveals the ancient history of Naples
Almost two thousand years after the eruption of Vesuvius that destroyed Pompeii and Herculaneum, certain periods of the history of Naples have just been reconstructed. Until now, historians and archaeologists had wondered about the impact of this volcanic eruption on the Aqua Augusta aqueduct which supplied Naples and neighboring cities with water.

Life Sciences - 16.05.2016
Enhanced hippocampal-cortical coupling improves memory
For the first time, scientists in the Center for Interdisciplinary Research in Biology (CNRS/INSERM/Collège de France) have produced direct evidence that the long-term storage of memories involves a dialogue between two brain structures, the hippocampus and cortex, during sleep; by enhancing this dialogue, they succeeded in triggering the consolidation of memories that would otherwise have been forgotten.

Health - Life Sciences - 10.05.2016
Staphylococcus aureus : deciphering a resistance strategy that thwarts certain antimicrobials
Staphylococcus aureus : deciphering a resistance strategy that thwarts certain antimicrobials
The natural presence of fatty acids in the human body leads to increased resistance of Staphylococcus aureus to a class of antimicrobials that target bacterial fatty acid biosynthesis. This discovery, based on research by INRA scientists in collaboration with INSERM, Hôpital Cochin APHP, the Université Paris Descartes, Institut Pasteur and CNRS scientists, is reported in an article in Nature 1 (5 October 2016).

Astronomy / Space Science - Earth Sciences - 02.05.2016
Although boiling, water does shape Martian terrain
Although boiling, water does shape Martian terrain
At present, liquid water on Mars only exists in small quantities as a boiling liquid, and only during the warmest time of day in summer. Its role has therefore been considered insignificant until now.

Life Sciences - Health - 27.04.2016
A single-celled organism capable of learning
A single-celled organism capable of learning
For the first time, scientists have demonstrated that an organism devoid of a nervous system is capable of learning. A team from the Centre de Recherches sur la Cognition Animale (CNRS/Université Toulouse III – Paul Sabatier) has succeeded in showing that a single-celled organism, the protist Physarum polycephalum, is capable of a type of learning called habituation.

Earth Sciences - Life Sciences - 21.04.2016
Giant plankton gains long-due attention
Giant plankton gains long-due attention
A team of marine biologists and oceanographers from CNRS, UPMC 1 and the German organization GEOMAR have revealed the importance in all the world's oceans of a group of large planktonic organisms called Rhizaria , which had previously been completely underestimated.

Life Sciences - 21.04.2016
Binding to produce flowers
Binding to produce flowers
The LEAFY protein, a transcription factor responsible 1 for flower development, is able to assemble itself in small chains made up of several proteins. This mechanism allows it to bind to and activate regions of the genome that are inaccessible to a single protein. These results were obtained by scientists in the Laboratoire de Physiologie Cellulaire Végétale (CNRS/Inra/CEA/Université Grenoble Alpes) and the Institut de Biologie Structurale (CNRS/CEA/Université Grenoble Alpes) 2 , working in collaboration with their international partners.

Health - Life Sciences - 20.04.2016
Recycling an anti-hypertensive agent to fight brain tumors
Treatments available for glioblastoma—malignant brain tumors—have little effect. An international collaboration 1 led by the Laboratoire Neurosciences Paris-Seine (CNRS/ INSERM/UPMC) 2 tested active ingredients from existing medications and eventually identified one compound of interest, prazosin, on these tumors.

Health - Life Sciences - 19.04.2016
The origin of heart dysfunctions in myotonic dystrophy identified
Font size Bookmark Print Tip a friend An international team, including researchers in France at Inserm, CNRS and the University of Strasbourg, brought together at IGBMC[1] is lifting the veil on the

Mechanical Engineering - Life Sciences - 14.04.2016
A Mechanical Feedback Restricts Sepal Growth and Shape in Arabidopsis
A Mechanical Feedback Restricts Sepal Growth and Shape in Arabidopsis
A research team of the Laboratory of Plant Reproduction and Developmen t (RDP - Inra, ENS de Lyon, CNRS, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1), has just revealed that organs sense their own growth and can therefore control their final shape.

Environment - Life Sciences - 14.04.2016
Tara PACIFIC 2016-2018
Tara PACIFIC 2016-2018
Coral reefs biodiversity facing climate change The research schooner Tara will leave her home port of Lorient on May 28th 2016 for a new expedition in the Asian Pacific.

Life Sciences - Health - 11.04.2016
Malaria: a new route of access to the heart of the parasite
Malaria: a new route of access to the heart of the parasite
Scientists have just identified an Achilles heel in the parasite that causes malaria, by showing that its optimum development is dependent on its ability to expropriate RNA molecules in infected cells – a host-pathogen interaction that had never previously been observed. Although the precise function of this deviation remains mysterious, these findings open new perspectives for the targeted delivery of therapeutic agents within the parasite.

This site uses cookies and analysis tools to improve the usability of the site. More information. |