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Results 81 - 100 of 124.


History / Archeology - Earth Sciences - 20.05.2016
Lead pollution reveals the ancient history of Naples
Lead pollution reveals the ancient history of Naples
View of the eruption of Vesuvius in 79 AD, from the bay of Naples, as imagined by the artist William Turner between 1817 and 1820 Almost two thousand years after the eruption of Vesuvius that destroyed Pompeii and Herculaneum, certain periods of the history of Naples have just been reconstructed. Until now, historians and archaeologists had wondered about the impact of this volcanic eruption on the Aqua Augusta aqueduct which supplied Naples and neighboring cities with water.

Earth Sciences - History / Archeology - 16.05.2016
Lead pollution reveals the ancient history of Naples
Lead pollution reveals the ancient history of Naples
Almost two thousand years after the eruption of Vesuvius that destroyed Pompeii and Herculaneum, certain periods of the history of Naples have just been reconstructed. Until now, historians and archaeologists had wondered about the impact of this volcanic eruption on the Aqua Augusta aqueduct which supplied Naples and neighboring cities with water.

Life Sciences - 16.05.2016
Enhanced hippocampal-cortical coupling improves memory
For the first time, scientists in the Center for Interdisciplinary Research in Biology (CNRS/INSERM/Collège de France) have produced direct evidence that the long-term storage of memories involves a dialogue between two brain structures, the hippocampus and cortex, during sleep; by enhancing this dialogue, they succeeded in triggering the consolidation of memories that would otherwise have been forgotten.

Health - Life Sciences - 10.05.2016
Staphylococcus aureus : deciphering a resistance strategy that thwarts certain antimicrobials
Staphylococcus aureus : deciphering a resistance strategy that thwarts certain antimicrobials
The natural presence of fatty acids in the human body leads to increased resistance of Staphylococcus aureus to a class of antimicrobials that target bacterial fatty acid biosynthesis. This discovery, based on research by INRA scientists in collaboration with INSERM, Hôpital Cochin APHP, the Université Paris Descartes, Institut Pasteur and CNRS scientists, is reported in an article in Nature 1 (5 October 2016).

Astronomy / Space Science - Earth Sciences - 02.05.2016
Although boiling, water does shape Martian terrain
Although boiling, water does shape Martian terrain
At present, liquid water on Mars only exists in small quantities as a boiling liquid, and only during the warmest time of day in summer. Its role has therefore been considered insignificant until now.

Life Sciences - Health - 27.04.2016
A single-celled organism capable of learning
A single-celled organism capable of learning
For the first time, scientists have demonstrated that an organism devoid of a nervous system is capable of learning. A team from the Centre de Recherches sur la Cognition Animale (CNRS/Université Toulouse III – Paul Sabatier) has succeeded in showing that a single-celled organism, the protist Physarum polycephalum, is capable of a type of learning called habituation.

Earth Sciences - Life Sciences - 21.04.2016
Giant plankton gains long-due attention
Giant plankton gains long-due attention
A team of marine biologists and oceanographers from CNRS, UPMC 1 and the German organization GEOMAR have revealed the importance in all the world's oceans of a group of large planktonic organisms called Rhizaria , which had previously been completely underestimated.

Life Sciences - 21.04.2016
Binding to produce flowers
Binding to produce flowers
The LEAFY protein, a transcription factor responsible 1 for flower development, is able to assemble itself in small chains made up of several proteins. This mechanism allows it to bind to and activate regions of the genome that are inaccessible to a single protein. These results were obtained by scientists in the Laboratoire de Physiologie Cellulaire Végétale (CNRS/Inra/CEA/Université Grenoble Alpes) and the Institut de Biologie Structurale (CNRS/CEA/Université Grenoble Alpes) 2 , working in collaboration with their international partners.

Health - Life Sciences - 20.04.2016
Recycling an anti-hypertensive agent to fight brain tumors
Treatments available for glioblastoma—malignant brain tumors—have little effect. An international collaboration 1 led by the Laboratoire Neurosciences Paris-Seine (CNRS/ INSERM/UPMC) 2 tested active ingredients from existing medications and eventually identified one compound of interest, prazosin, on these tumors.

Health - Life Sciences - 19.04.2016
The origin of heart dysfunctions in myotonic dystrophy identified
Font size Bookmark Print Tip a friend An international team, including researchers in France at Inserm, CNRS and the University of Strasbourg, brought together at IGBMC is lifting the veil on the mol

Mechanical Engineering - 14.04.2016
A Mechanical Feedback Restricts Sepal Growth and Shape in Arabidopsis
A Mechanical Feedback Restricts Sepal Growth and Shape in Arabidopsis
A research team of the Laboratory of Plant Reproduction and Developmen t (RDP - Inra, ENS de Lyon, CNRS, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1), has just revealed that organs sense their own growth and can therefore control their final shape.

Environment - Life Sciences - 14.04.2016
Tara PACIFIC 2016-2018
Tara PACIFIC 2016-2018
Coral reefs biodiversity facing climate change The research schooner Tara will leave her home port of Lorient on May 28th 2016 for a new expedition in the Asian Pacific.

Life Sciences - Health - 11.04.2016
Malaria: a new route of access to the heart of the parasite
Malaria: a new route of access to the heart of the parasite
Scientists have just identified an Achilles heel in the parasite that causes malaria, by showing that its optimum development is dependent on its ability to expropriate RNA molecules in infected cells – a host-pathogen interaction that had never previously been observed. Although the precise function of this deviation remains mysterious, these findings open new perspectives for the targeted delivery of therapeutic agents within the parasite.

Environment - Agronomy / Food Science - 11.04.2016
Goals of the Paris Agreement on climate unachievable without reducing greenhouse gas emissions in agriculture
Goals of the Paris Agreement on climate unachievable without reducing greenhouse gas emissions in agriculture
For the first time, scientists have calculated the reduction in emissions required in agriculture to reach the goal of the Paris Agreement to limit global warming to 2°C by 2100.

Astronomy / Space Science - Chemistry - 07.04.2016
Origin of life: an artificial comet holds the missing piece
Origin of life: an artificial comet holds the missing piece
Researchers have for the first time shown that ribose, a sugar that is one of the building blocks of genetic material in living organisms, may have formed in cometary ices. To obtain this result, scientists at the Institut de Chimie de Nice (CNRS/Université Nice Sophia Antipolis) carried out a highly detailed analysis of an artificial comet created by their colleagues at the Institut d'Astrophysique Spatiale (CNRS/Université Paris-Sud).

Chemistry - Physics - 06.04.2016
Nanoporous material's strange
Nanoporous material’s strange "breathing" behavior
High-tech sponges of the infinitely small, nanoporous materials can capture and release gaseous or liquid chemicals in a controlled way.

Life Sciences - Health - 05.04.2016
Jumping genes: all guilty?
Font size Bookmark Print Tip a friend Transposable elements, also known as 'jumping genes? are DNA fragments that can move or copy themselves from one location to another on the chromosomes.

Astronomy / Space Science - Earth Sciences - 31.03.2016
The Moon thought to play a major role in maintaining Earth's magnetic field
The Moon thought to play a major role in maintaining Earth’s magnetic field
The Earth's magnetic field permanently protects us from the charged particles and radiation that originate in the Sun. This shield is produced by the geodynamo, the rapid motion of huge quantities of liquid iron alloy in the Earth's outer core. To maintain this magnetic field until the present day, the classical model required the Earth's core to have cooled by around 3 000 °C over the past 4.3 billion years.

Environment - 23.03.2016
The past, present and future of African dust
The past, present and future of African dust
So much dust is scattered across the planet by the winds of the Sahara that it alters the climate. However, the emission and transport of this dust, which can reach the poles, fluctuate considerably. Although many hypotheses have been put forward to explain this phenomenon, no unambiguous relationship between this dust and the climate had been established until now.

Chemistry - Environment - 23.03.2016
Staying in shape: How wood chemistry relates to structural stability
Staying in shape: How wood chemistry relates to structural stability
Wood has many uses, which require to know its shrinking 1 and swelling capacity in relation to humidity (known as dimensional stability). Researchers from the CNRS and Cirad 2 have shown that in Bagassa guianensis , a fast-growing Guianese tree, the secondary metabolites, whose main purpose is to defend the tree against insects and fungi, also serve to reduce shrinkage.