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Results 21 - 40 of 63.


Life Sciences - Health - 04.10.2016
Invasive insects: an underestimated cost to the world economy
Invasive insects: an underestimated cost to the world economy
Invasive insects cause at least 69 billion euros of damage per annum worldwide.

Life Sciences - 29.09.2016
The structure of the BinAB toxin revealed: one small step for Man, a major problem for mosquitoes!
The structure of the BinAB toxin revealed: one small step for Man, a major problem for mosquitoes!
Could we get rid of mosquitoes without polluting the environment? Yes, we can! The BinAB toxin, produced in crystal form by a bacterium, specifically kills the larvae of Culex and Anopheles mosquitoes, but it is inactive on tiger mosquitoes (or Aedes), the vectors for dengue fever and chikungunya.

Life Sciences - 16.09.2016
Multiscale quantification of morphodynamics: MorphoLeaf software for 2D shape analysis
Multiscale quantification of morphodynamics: MorphoLeaf software for 2D shape analysis
The different steps of the growth of an Arabidopsis thaliana leaf, from its origin to 2,5mm. Views generated by MorphoLeaf.

Life Sciences - 15.09.2016
How plant roots sense and react to soil flooding
While we already knew that plant roots were capable of sensing many individual soil characteristics (water, nutrients and oxygen availability), we did not have any understanding of how they integrated these signals in order to respond in an appropriate way.

Life Sciences - Health - 12.09.2016
Low birth rate after cloning: the consequences of highly disruptive interactions between uterus and embryo
Low birth rate after cloning: the consequences of highly disruptive interactions between uterus and embryo
When comparing cloned animal embryos and embryos that come about as a result of artificial insemination, there is a difference in gene expression at the moment implantation occurs in the uterus for more than 5 000 genes. Researchers at INRA and the University of California are shining the spotlight on this critical step for the survival of cloned embryos in cattle.

Life Sciences - Health - 12.09.2016
Low birth rate after cloning: the consequences of highly disruptive interactions between uterus and embryo
Low birth rate after cloning: the consequences of highly disruptive interactions between uterus and embryo
When comparing cloned animal embryos and embryos that come about as a result of artificial insemination, there is a difference in gene expression at the moment implantation occurs in the uterus for more than 5 000 genes. Researchers at INRA and the University of California are shining the spotlight on this critical step for the survival of cloned embryos in cattle.

Life Sciences - Health - 02.09.2016
Placenta in females, muscle mass in males: the dual heritage of a virus
Placenta in females, muscle mass in males: the dual heritage of a virus
It was already known that genes inherited from ancient retroviruses 1 are essential to the placenta in mammals, a finding to which scientists in the Laboratoire Physiologie et Pathologie Moléculaires des Rétrovirus Endogènes et Infectieux (CNRS/Université Paris-Sud) contributed. Today, the same scientists 2 have revealed a new chapter in this astonishing story: these genes of viral origin may also be responsible for the more developed muscle mass seen in males! Their findings are published on 2 September 2016 in PLOS Genetics .

Life Sciences - Health - 30.08.2016
Caffeine reverts memory deficits
Caffeine reverts memory deficits
The mechanism by which caffeine counteracts age-related cognitive deficits in animals has been revealed. The study coordinated by Portuguese researchers from Instituto de Medicina Molecular (iMM Lisboa) and collaborators from Inserm in Lille, France, along with teams from Germany and United States, showed that the abnormal expression of a particular receptor - the adenosine A2A, target for caffeine - in the brain of rats induces an aging-like profile namely memory impairments linked to the loss of stress controlling mechanisms.

Life Sciences - Electroengineering - 24.08.2016
Artificial retinas: promising leads towards clearer vision
Artificial retinas: promising leads towards clearer vision
A major therapeutic challenge, the retinal prostheses that have been under development during the past ten years can enable some blind subjects to perceive light signals, but the image thus restored is still far from being clear. By comparing in rodents the activity of the visual cortex generated artificially by implants against that produced by “natural sight”, scientists from CNRS, CEA, Inserm, AP-HM and Aix-Marseille Université identified two factors that limit the resolution of prostheses.

Health - Life Sciences - 05.08.2016
Malaria and toxoplasmosis have an Achilles heel from plants
Malaria and toxoplasmosis have an Achilles heel from plants
To survive, the parasites responsible for malaria and toxoplasmosis depend on mechanisms inherited from the plant world. This is what a team of researchers from CNRS 1 (Institute for Advanced Biosciences, CNRS/INSERM/Université Grenoble Alpes) and the University of Melbourne 2 has shown. They have just published two studies in Cell Microbiology and PLOS Pathogens.

Life Sciences - Health - 03.08.2016
The keys to a major process in DNA repair
Researchers from the Institut Jacques Monod (CNRS/University of Paris Diderot), the Institute of Biology of the Ecole Normale Supérieure (ENS/CNRS/Inserm), and the University of Bristol, have described for the first time in its totality the mechanisms by which DNA damaged by UV radiation is repaired, and how the proteins involved in this process cooperate to ensure its efficiency.

Life Sciences - Health - 29.07.2016
A virtual brain helps decrypt epilepsy
Researchers at CNRS, INSERM, Aix-Marseille University and AP-HM have just created a virtual brain that can reconstitute the brain of a person affected by epilepsy for the first time. From this work we understand better how the disease works and can also better prepare for surgery. These results are published in Neuroimage, on July 28, 2016.

Health - Life Sciences - 29.07.2016
A virtual brain helps decrypt epilepsy
A virtual brain helps decrypt epilepsy
Researchers at CNRS, INSERM, Aix-Marseille University and AP-HM have just created a virtual brain that can reconstitute the brain of a person affected by epilepsy for the first time. From this work we understand better how the disease works and can also better prepare for surgery. These results are published in Neuroimage, on July 28, 2016.

Life Sciences - Health - 21.07.2016
Long term correction of hyperbilirubinemia in animal models of Crigler-Najjar syndrome
Dr. Federico MINGOZZI, Team Leader of the Immunology and Liver Gene Transfer unit at Généthon, (Inserm U951/UPMC), France, has demonstrated the long-term efficacy of an optimized AAV-UGT1A1 ve

Health - Life Sciences - 20.07.2016
An antibody-based drug for multiple sclerosis
Inserm Unit U919, directed by Prof. Denis Vivien (‘Serine Proteases and Physiopathology of the Neurovascular Unit') has developed an antibody with potential therapeutic effects against multiple sclerosis.

Life Sciences - Mathematics - 11.07.2016
How organ regularity emerges from cell randomness
How organ regularity emerges from cell randomness
An international team (Cornell University, Hokkaido University, Max Planck Institute, Ecole normale supérieure de Lyon / Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1 / CNRS / INRA) unravels how random cell growth contributes to making organs reach the correct size and shape. This study was published in What makes an elephant look like an elephant, or a mouse look like a mouse? How do our two arms reach less than 1% dissimilarity in length? Despite continuous progress in developmental biology, we still do not know the answers to such deceptively simple questions.

Life Sciences - 27.06.2016
Attraction of the opposite: when fat leads the way for plant proteins
Attraction of the opposite: when fat leads the way for plant proteins
This little plant Arabidopsis thaliana A team of the Plant Reproduction and Development laboratory ( RDP - Université de Lyon, ENS de Lyon, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, CNRS, INRA) just found that certain lipid species power an electrostatic field that controls protein localization at the cell surface.

Life Sciences - Health - 17.06.2016
A novel research program on traumatic memories
How will the traumatic events of the terrorist attacks of 13 November 2015 evolve in people's memories, whether collective or individual?

Life Sciences - History / Archeology - 02.06.2016
Dogs were domesticated not once, but twice... in different parts of the world
Dogs were domesticated not once, but twice... in different parts of the world
The question, ‘Where do domestic dogs come from'', has vexed scholars for a very long time. Some argue that humans first domesticated wolves in Europe, while others claim this happened in Central Asia or China. A new paper suggests that all these claims may be right.

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