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Results 41 - 60 of 63.


Life Sciences - 16.05.2016
Enhanced hippocampal-cortical coupling improves memory
For the first time, scientists in the Center for Interdisciplinary Research in Biology (CNRS/INSERM/Collège de France) have produced direct evidence that the long-term storage of memories involves a dialogue between two brain structures, the hippocampus and cortex, during sleep; by enhancing this dialogue, they succeeded in triggering the consolidation of memories that would otherwise have been forgotten.

Health - Life Sciences - 10.05.2016
Staphylococcus aureus : deciphering a resistance strategy that thwarts certain antimicrobials
Staphylococcus aureus : deciphering a resistance strategy that thwarts certain antimicrobials
The natural presence of fatty acids in the human body leads to increased resistance of Staphylococcus aureus to a class of antimicrobials that target bacterial fatty acid biosynthesis. This discovery, based on research by INRA scientists in collaboration with INSERM, Hôpital Cochin APHP, the Université Paris Descartes, Institut Pasteur and CNRS scientists, is reported in an article in Nature 1 (5 October 2016).

Life Sciences - Health - 27.04.2016
A single-celled organism capable of learning
A single-celled organism capable of learning
For the first time, scientists have demonstrated that an organism devoid of a nervous system is capable of learning. A team from the Centre de Recherches sur la Cognition Animale (CNRS/Université Toulouse III – Paul Sabatier) has succeeded in showing that a single-celled organism, the protist Physarum polycephalum, is capable of a type of learning called habituation.

Earth Sciences - Life Sciences - 21.04.2016
Giant plankton gains long-due attention
Giant plankton gains long-due attention
A team of marine biologists and oceanographers from CNRS, UPMC 1 and the German organization GEOMAR have revealed the importance in all the world's oceans of a group of large planktonic organisms called Rhizaria , which had previously been completely underestimated.

Life Sciences - 21.04.2016
Binding to produce flowers
Binding to produce flowers
The LEAFY protein, a transcription factor responsible 1 for flower development, is able to assemble itself in small chains made up of several proteins. This mechanism allows it to bind to and activate regions of the genome that are inaccessible to a single protein. These results were obtained by scientists in the Laboratoire de Physiologie Cellulaire Végétale (CNRS/Inra/CEA/Université Grenoble Alpes) and the Institut de Biologie Structurale (CNRS/CEA/Université Grenoble Alpes) 2 , working in collaboration with their international partners.

Health - Life Sciences - 20.04.2016
Recycling an anti-hypertensive agent to fight brain tumors
Treatments available for glioblastoma—malignant brain tumors—have little effect. An international collaboration 1 led by the Laboratoire Neurosciences Paris-Seine (CNRS/ INSERM/UPMC) 2 tested active ingredients from existing medications and eventually identified one compound of interest, prazosin, on these tumors.

Health - Life Sciences - 19.04.2016
The origin of heart dysfunctions in myotonic dystrophy identified
Font size Bookmark Print Tip a friend An international team, including researchers in France at Inserm, CNRS and the University of Strasbourg, brought together at IGBMC[1] is lifting the veil on the

Mechanical Engineering - Life Sciences - 14.04.2016
A Mechanical Feedback Restricts Sepal Growth and Shape in Arabidopsis
A Mechanical Feedback Restricts Sepal Growth and Shape in Arabidopsis
A research team of the Laboratory of Plant Reproduction and Developmen t (RDP - Inra, ENS de Lyon, CNRS, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1), has just revealed that organs sense their own growth and can therefore control their final shape.

Environment - Life Sciences - 14.04.2016
Tara PACIFIC 2016-2018
Tara PACIFIC 2016-2018
Coral reefs biodiversity facing climate change The research schooner Tara will leave her home port of Lorient on May 28th 2016 for a new expedition in the Asian Pacific.

Life Sciences - Health - 11.04.2016
Malaria: a new route of access to the heart of the parasite
Malaria: a new route of access to the heart of the parasite
Scientists have just identified an Achilles heel in the parasite that causes malaria, by showing that its optimum development is dependent on its ability to expropriate RNA molecules in infected cells – a host-pathogen interaction that had never previously been observed. Although the precise function of this deviation remains mysterious, these findings open new perspectives for the targeted delivery of therapeutic agents within the parasite.

Life Sciences - Health - 05.04.2016
Jumping genes: all guilty?
Font size Bookmark Print Tip a friend Transposable elements, also known as 'jumping genes? are DNA fragments that can move or copy themselves from one location to another on the chromosomes.

Health - Life Sciences - 16.03.2016
Spasticity: two potential therapeutic avenues
Spasticity: two potential therapeutic avenues
Following spinal cord injury, most patients experience an exaggeration of muscle tone called spasticity, which frequently leads to physical disability.

Life Sciences - Health - 03.03.2016
30 small neurons join forces against pain
30 small neurons join forces against pain
Oxytocin plays a crucial role in modulating the response to pain, but until now the process leading to its release was unknown.

Life Sciences - History / Archeology - 22.02.2016
Ancient DNA reveals phylogeny of prehistoric armadillos
Ancient DNA reveals phylogeny of prehistoric armadillos
Before the last ice age, South America had an impressive array of megafauna including the megatherium, a sloth the size of an elephant, and a wide variety of glyptodonts, a group of imposing armored mammals. Glyptodonts have been traditionally considered to represent a phylogenetically distinct group close to the cingulates (armadillos).

Life Sciences - Health - 19.02.2016
The intestinal microbiota: a new ally for optimum growth
The intestinal microbiota: a new ally for optimum growth
The intestinal microbiota is necessary to ensure optimum postnatal growth and contributes to determining the size of adult individuals, notably in the event of undernutrition.

Life Sciences - Earth Sciences - 10.02.2016
Plankton network linked to ocean's biological carbon pump revealed
Plankton network linked to ocean’s biological carbon pump revealed
The ocean is the largest carbon sink on the planet. The community of planktonic organisms involved in the removal of carbon from the upper layers of the ocean has now been described by an interdisciplinary team bringing together oceanographers, biologists and computer scientists, principally from the CNRS, UPMC, Nantes University, VIB, EMBL and CEA.

Psychology - Life Sciences - 08.02.2016
Toxoplasmosis: morbid attraction to leopards in parasitized chimpanzees
Researchers from the Centre d'Écologie Fonctionnelle et Évolutive (CNRS/Université de Montpellier/Université Paul Valéry Montpellier 3/EPHE) have shown that chimpanzees infected with toxoplasmosis are attracted by the urine of their natural predators, leopards, but not by urine from other large felines.

Health - Life Sciences - 05.02.2016
Will the globetrotting Zika virus arrive in Europe soon?
Will the globetrotting Zika virus arrive in Europe soon?
We know about chikungunya and dengue fevers, but now there's another virus transmitted by mosquitos: Zika.

Life Sciences - Health - 27.01.2016
Tuberculosis: discovery of a critical stage in the evolution of the bacillus towards pathogenicity
Tuberculosis: discovery of a critical stage in the evolution of the bacillus towards pathogenicity
Porphyran, a polysaccharide present in the cell walls of a red algae that is used notably in the preparation of sushi, is broken down specifically by an enzyme called porphyranase. This new enzymatic activity has been identified in marine bacteria and, surprisingly, in the bacteria that populate the gut of the Japanese.

Agronomy / Food Science - Life Sciences - 22.01.2016
Cats domesticated in China earlier than 3000 BC
Cats domesticated in China earlier than 3000 BC
Were domestic cats brought to China over 5 000 years ago? Or were small cats domesticated in China at that time? There was no way of deciding between these two hypotheses until a team from the 'Archéozoologie, Archéobotanique: Sociétés, Pratiques et Environnements' laboratory (CNRS/MNHN), in collaboration with colleagues from the UK and China 1 , succeeded in determining the species corresponding to cat remains found in agricultural settlements in China, dating from around 3500 BC.

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