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Results 1 - 8 of 8.


Life Sciences - Health - 24.09.2019
Disarming a probiotic to improve its benefits
Disarming a probiotic to improve its benefits
For more than a century, the Nissle 1917 strain of the bacterium Escherichia coli has been used as a probiotic to treat gastrointestinal disorders. However, this bacterium also produces a toxin, colibactin, which has deleterious effects on host DNA and might cause colon cancer. It is therefore crucial to understand the mechanisms at play in the strain if we wish to limit undesirable side effects.

Life Sciences - Health - 25.07.2019
Artificial sweeteners: certain adverse metabolic effects revealed in a preclinical model
Artificial sweeteners: certain adverse metabolic effects revealed in a preclinical model
INRA researchers, in collaboration with the University of Adelaide, Australia, studied the effects that a widely used artificial sweetener blend, i.e. acesulfame K-sucralose, has on metabolism. For the first time, they revealed ' in animals ' an increase in glucose absorption, particularly in the brain and fatty tissues, indicating certain undesirable effects on metabolism and insulin sensitivity.

Health - 24.07.2019
Partially hydrolysed (hypoallergenic) baby formulas do not reduce allergy risks in infants
Partially hydrolysed (hypoallergenic) baby formulas do not reduce allergy risks in infants
Often, hypoallergenic formulas are recommended for infants who are not exclusively breastfed and who are at risk of developing allergies. While it is assumed that such formulas reduce the development of allergies later in life, it is unclear whether this claim is true. A team of INRA and INSERM researchers have shown that the consumption of partially hydrolysed (hypoallergenic) formulas was not associated with a reduced risk of developing allergies, findings that were recently published in the journal Pediatric Allergy and Immunology .

Environment - Health - 13.06.2019
Better air quality: what should the target values be for improving health?
Better air quality: what should the target values be for improving health?
To produce a significant reduction in mortality due to fine particulates, their average level should be reduced by at least 3 micrograms per m3 as a yearly average, concludes an interdisciplinary study led by researchers from Inserm, the CNRS, INRA, Atmo Auvergne Rhône-Alpes and the Université Grenoble Alpes.

Health - Agronomy / Food Science - 12.06.2019
The natural lipids in buttermilk could contribute to reducing cardiovascular risk in vulnerable populations
A French consortium led by INRA, in collaboration with INSERM, the Universities of Lyon and Clermont Auvergne, Lyon Civil Hospitals and the Human Nutrition Research Centres (CRNH) of Rhône-Alpes and Auvergne, have now demonstrated that consuming certain lipids present naturally in dairy products (called "polar lipids") could reduce the cardiovascular risk in overweight postmenopausal women by lowering their blood levels of LDL-cholesterol ("bad" cholesterol) and triglycerides.

Life Sciences - Health - 11.06.2019
Bluetongue virus can hijack the cellular machinery of its host
Bluetongue virus can hijack the cellular machinery of its host
Researchers at INRA, ANSES, and ENVA have discovered that bluetongue virus can enhance its replication by exploiting one of its host's cellular pathways. Published in the Journal of Virology , their results could help the quest to identify effective antiviral compounds for combating the virus. Bluetongue virus (BTV) can infect wild and domestic species of ruminants (ovines, caprines, and bovines).

Health - Agronomy / Food Science - 05.06.2019
Consumption of ultra-processed food and risk of cardiovascular disease
Consumption of ultra-processed food and risk of cardiovascular disease
In an article published May 30, 2019 in the British Medical Journal , researchers from Inserm, Inra, Université Paris 13 and Cnam in the Nutritional Epidemiology Research Team (EREN) report an increased risk of cardiovascular disease in consumers of ultra-processed foods in the NutriNet-Santé cohort.

Life Sciences - Health - 20.03.2019
Control of mosquito-borne diseases: discovery of a new genetic element in the Wolbachia bacterium
Control of mosquito-borne diseases: discovery of a new genetic element in the Wolbachia bacterium
Researchers from INRA, CIRAD, CEA, the University of Montpellier, and Chicago and Vanderbilt Universities in the United States have developed an innovative method for analysing the genome of the Wolbachia bacterium. This endosymbiotic* bacterium infects more than 70% of insects and is capable of influencing insect transmission of pathogens such as dengue or Zika virus.

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