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Environment - Earth Sciences - 18.04.2024
The Earth, precariously balanced
Aerial view of slash-and-burn agriculture in the state of Amazonas, western Brazil (September 2022). On our planet, everything is interconnected, from terrestrial and marine ecosystems and biodiversity to ice sheets, rivers and oceans. But a recent report reveals that the dynamics of these different systems is being destabilised by human activities to such an extent that they are reaching points of no return.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 10.04.2024
A rich 125,000-year-old coastal ecosystem discovered under Ariane 6 in French Guiana
A rich 125,000-year-old coastal ecosystem discovered under Ariane 6 in French Guiana
An international consortium of paleontologists, geologists and biologists describes the discovery of fossil assemblages spanning the last 130,000 years beneath the Ariane 6 rocket launch site in Kourou, French Guiana. The consortium, coordinated by scientists from the Montpellier Institute of Evolutionary Sciences (Université de Montpellier/CNRS/IRD) and the Université de Guyane/Géosciences Montpellier, includes Frédéric Quillévéré from the Laboratoire de Géologie de Lyon : Terre, Planètrs, Environnement (LGL-TPE, CNRS/Université Lyon 1/ENS de Lyon/Université Jean Monnet).

History / Archeology - Earth Sciences - 22.12.2023
The ancient port of Lechaion has been active since the Late Bronze Age
Publication involving a former ENS de Lyon PhD candidate and the EVS laboratory, in the journal Marine Geology . Earliest Evidence of Port-Related lead pollution in Bronze Age Greece First discovery of brown coal in a stratigraphic context at the end of the Bronze Age Lechaion's harbour archaeological chronology pushed back by at least 5 centuries New perspectives on regional economy and trade during the LBA/EIA transition Lechaion in Corinth, Greece, is the largest ancient port in Greece.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 06.12.2023
The ocean may be storing more carbon than estimated in earlier studies
The ocean may be storing more carbon than estimated in earlier studies
The ocean's capacity to store atmospheric carbon dioxide is some 20% greater than the estimates contained in the latest IPCC report 1 . These are the findings of a study to be published in the journal Nature on December 6, 2023, led by an international team including a biologist from the CNRS 2 . The scientists looked at the role played by plankton in the natural transport of carbon from surface waters down to the seabed.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 14.11.2023
Mountain: it is now possible to quantify the risk associated with rockfalls in the Andes
Researchers from INRAE, Universidad del Desarrollo (Chile), University of Geneva and University of Grenoble developed a new method to assess the risk associated with rockfalls in the mountains, taking into account various triggering factors and all the issues exposed. They successfully tested it in the Chilean Andes.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 07.11.2023
Greenland's ice shelves have lost more than a third of their volume
Greenland’s ice shelves have lost more than a third of their volume
The largest floating ice shelves in the polar ice sheet have lost more than a third of their volume since 1978.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 02.10.2023
Boreal and temperate forests now main global carbon sinks
Using a new analysis method for satellite images, an international research team, coordinated by the French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) and INRAE, mapped for the first time annual changes in global forest biomass between 2010 and 2019. Researchers discovered that boreal and temperate forests have become the main global carbon sinks.

Earth Sciences - 09.02.2023
Mission to monitor seafloor fault at foot of Mount Etna
Mission to monitor seafloor fault at foot of Mount Etna
The North Alfeo Fault runs across the seafloor at the base of Mount Etna, the tallest and currently most active European volcano, next to an urban area with a population of one million. The Focus project seeks to better understand seismic processes in action and allow for surveillance of movement along the fault.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 06.01.2023
A CO2 sink in the South Pacific ocean desert
A newly identified process of natural iron fertilization in the ocean fuels regional CO2 sinks. This was demonstrated by a study published May 25 in Science and co-authored by 25 researchers from the Tonga project. This project was led by two researchers from the IRD and CNRS, with over 90 scientists from 14 French laboratories based in mainland France, New Caledonia, and 6 international universities.

Earth Sciences - 08.12.2022
Mapping the chemistry of the Earth’s mantle
Publication of the LGL-TPE in the journal PNAS on November 21, 2022. CNRS-INSU communication on December 7, 2022. In the 1980s, geochemical observations led researchers to propose a geodynamic model of the mantle's marbled structure. A team of scientists, some of whom are attached to the Laboratory of Geology of Lyon: Earth, Planets, Environment (LGL-TPE, CNRS/ENS de Lyon/Claude Bernard Lyon 1 University), has been working on this model using a seismological perspective.

Paleontology - Earth Sciences - 17.10.2022
Neanderthals appear to have been carnivores
Neanderthals appear to have been carnivores
For the first time, zinc isotope ratios in tooth enamel have been analysed with the aim of identifying the diet of a Neanderthal. Other chemical tracers indicate that this individual did not consume the blood of their prey, but ate the bone marrow without consuming the bones. A new study published on october 17th in the journal PNAS , led by a CNRS researcher, has for the first time used zinc isotope analysis to determine the position of Neanderthals in the food chain.

Earth Sciences - Astronomy / Space - 25.08.2022
Planet Mars: Perseverance rover makes surprising geological discoveries in Jezero Crater
Planet Mars: Perseverance rover makes surprising geological discoveries in Jezero Crater
On February 21, 2021, NASA's Perseverance rover landed in the Jezero Crater on Mars. In October 1 , the rover confirmed the importance of its landing site, showing that Jezero Crater really was the site of a lake 3.6 billion years ago. Perseverance's geological discoveries in the crater's floor are described in four papers published on August 25, 2022 in Science and Science Advances .

Earth Sciences - Environment - 17.08.2022
Plate tectonics drives ocean oxygenation
Plate tectonics drives ocean oxygenation
Until now, it has been assumed that the oxygenation of the oceans over geological timescales has mainly been driven by atmospheric oxygen levels. However, a new study published in Nature June 27 2022   suggests otherwise. Work by scientists at the Biogeosciences Laboratory (CNRS/UBFC), together with their colleagues at the University of California's Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, shows that the movement of tectonic plates has probably contributed to ocean oxygenation.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 10.06.2022
Paname 2022: campaigns to study air quality and urban climate
Paname 2022: campaigns to study air quality and urban climate
The 2022 Paname initiative 1 aims to better understand the causes and effects of climate change in urban environments through intensive measurement campaigns planned for the Paris region this summer. From the studies, information will be derived that is key to making cities more resilient to future climate realities.

Astronomy / Space - Earth Sciences - 01.04.2022
Perseverance records the first ever sounds from Mars
Perseverance records the first ever sounds from Mars
Using a microphone developed in France, the Perseverance rover has recorded the first ever sounds from Mars audible to the human ear. By analysing these sounds, scientists have been able to find out more about the physical characteristics of the Martian atmosphere, and in particular about the speed of sound and its attenuation there.

Astronomy / Space - Earth Sciences - 13.01.2022
A new model for the formation of the lunar crust
A new model for the formation of the lunar crust
In a new study published in Geophysical Research Letters, two scientists - Chloé Michaut from Ecole normale supérieure de Lyon 1 and Jerome A. Neufeld from University of Cambridge 2 , propose a new model of crystallization of the lunar magma ocean where the crystals remain suspended in the lunar interior and the formation of the crust only begins once a critical crystal content is reached.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 21.12.2021
Microplastic discovered in 'pristine' Pyrenees mountain air
Microplastic discovered in ’pristine’ Pyrenees mountain air
Previously detected in rivers, oceans, and snow, 1 microplastic has now been found in the high-altitude air surrounding the Pic du Midi (2,877 m)-by an international research team including scientists from the CNRS, Université Grenoble Alpes, 2 and the University of Strathclyde (Scotland).

Environment - Earth Sciences - 13.10.2021
Climate model shows that Venus could never have had oceans
Climate model shows that Venus could never have had oceans
Whether Venus, one of the Solar System's four terrestrial planets, ever had oceans remains an unsolved puzzle. Although an American study hypothesized involving in particular scientists from the CNRS and University of Versailles-Saint Quentin-en-Yvelines 1 (UVSQ). Using a state-of-the-art climate model, the research team has come up with an alternative scenario to the American study.

Astronomy / Space - Earth Sciences - 07.10.2021
Mars: first results from the Perseverance rover
Mars: first results from the Perseverance rover
Images from Perseverance's French-American instrument SuperCam show that the crater where the rover landed once contained a lake. The SuperCam observations also identified strata containing boulders, related to a major change in the hydrological regime. This study, led by a French researcher, will facilitate selection of the most suitable areas for Perseverance to collect samples.

Earth Sciences - 22.09.2021
Continental growth is not a continuous process
Continental growth is not a continuous process
One of Earth's unique features is that it has continents. Contrary to many theories, the continents have always been rich in silica (which is found in quartz for example). The continents did not form continuously over time but result from episodic events throughout Earth's history. The continents, a specific feature of our planet, still hold many secrets.
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