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Life Sciences - Health - 10.07.2024
Discovery of a new defence mechanism in bacteria
Discovery of a new defence mechanism in bacteria
When confronted with an antibiotic, toxic substance, or other source of considerable stress, bacteria are able to activate a defence mechanism using cell-to-cell communication to 'warn' unaffected bacteria, which can then anticipate, shield themselves and spread the warning signal. This mechanism 1 has just been described for the first time by a team of scientists 2 from CNRS and Université de Toulouse III - Paul Sabatier.

Health - Life Sciences - 10.07.2024
A valve made from human collagen opens up new avenues for the treatment of a paediatric heart disease
MRI image showing the reconstructed pulmonary valve (circled in red) that is closing perfectly 7 days after implantation. Fabien Kawecki/Inserm Researchers from Inserm have developed a pulmonary valve using human collagen. A device that could ultimately be a game-changer in the treatment of paediatric heart diseases, such as tetralogy of Fallot.

Life Sciences - Health - 05.07.2024
A better understanding of Alzheimer's disease: A study confirms the utility of caffeine as treatment avenue
A better understanding of Alzheimer’s disease: A study confirms the utility of caffeine as treatment avenue
In France, 900 000 people have Alzheimer's disease or a related condition. The risk of developing Alzheimer's depends on genetic and environmental factors. Among these factors, various epidemiological studies suggest that the regular consumption of moderate amounts of caffeine slows age-related cognitive decline and the risk of developing the disease.

Life Sciences - Health - 05.07.2024
Alzheimer's disease: caffeine as a treatment option
Alzheimer’s disease: caffeine as a treatment option
In France, 900,000 people suffer from Alzheimer's or a related disease. The risk of developing Alzheimer's disease depends on genetic and environmental factors. Among the latter, various epidemiological studies suggest that regular, moderate caffeine consumption slows age-related cognitive decline and the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease.

Life Sciences - Environment - 04.07.2024
Protecting biodiversity on a global scale: ready-to-use genetic diversity indicators
Genetic diversity is fundamental to the maintenance and resilience of species and ecosystems. In the context of the Kunming-Montreal Global Biodiversity Framework (CMBKM), of which France is a signatory, an international consortium, including INRAE, Claude Bernard Lyon 1 University and the Conservatoire d'espaces naturels d'Occitanie, has developed and demonstrated the feasibility of using 2 genetic diversity indicators based on existing and available data without the need for DNA.

Life Sciences - Environment - 04.07.2024
Protecting biodiversity worldwide: genetic diversity indicators are validated and ready for use
Conserving genetic diversity is an essential part of maintaining the health and resilience of species and ecosystems. The Kunming-Montreal Global Biodiversity Framework is requiring its signatories, among them France, to use two genetic diversity indicators that can be estimated using readily available data that may or may not be DNA based.

Life Sciences - Health - 03.07.2024
Immune cells that protect against post-stroke neurological damage
Immune cells that protect against post-stroke neurological damage
Ageing greatly increases the risk of ischaemic stroke. A team of researchers from Inserm, Caen-Normandy University Hospital and Université de Caen Normandie have looked at the role that immune cells known as central nervous system-associated macrophages (CAMs) could play in the neurological damage that occurs following a stroke.

Life Sciences - 02.07.2024
A new breakthrough in understanding regeneration in a marine worm
A new breakthrough in understanding regeneration in a marine worm
The sea worm Platynereis dumerilii is only a few centimetres long but has a remarkable ability: in just a few days, it can regenerate entire parts of its body after an injury or amputation. By focusing more specifically on the mechanisms at play in the regeneration of this worm's tail, a research team led by a CNRS scientist 1 has observed that gut cells play a role in the regeneration of the intestine as well as other tissues such as muscle and epidermis.

Life Sciences - Agronomy / Food Science - 02.07.2024
Research in pigs shows gut microbiota is partially heritable
Comprising billions of microorganisms, the gut microbiota progressively matures after birth in humans and other animals. While environmental factors, and especially diet, are known to have a major influence on microbiota development and composition, the role of genetics remains a topic of debate. In a groundbreaking study recently published in Microbiome, INRAE researchers used pigs to experimentally demonstrate that gut microbiota composition is partly heritable.

Life Sciences - 01.07.2024
Training sheep to complete awake MRI imaging
Sheep are capable of learning a wide range of complex tasks. A research team from INRAE was able to prove this by training sheep to undergo MRI scans while awake-a world-first. This innovative method, which hinges on trainer-lamb cooperation, helps produce quality images without the need for anaesthesia.

Life Sciences - Health - 14.06.2024
A 'pseudo-prion' molecule protects the brain from Alzheimer's disease in mice
A ’pseudo-prion’ molecule protects the brain from Alzheimer’s disease in mice
A research team 1 led by scientists from CNRS and Université Grenoble Alpes has discovered that the injection of a modified "pseudo-prion" protein into the brains of mice could protect the animals against Alzheimer's disease, a pathology that currently affects nearly a million people in France. This neurodegenerative disease originates from lesions caused by an abnormal accumulation in the brain of two proteins: amyloid- and Tau.

Life Sciences - 12.06.2024
Monkey brains recognize human voices
Monkey brains recognize human voices
A recent study shows that neurons in monkey brains respond to human voices: a groundbreaking discovery of the neural mechanisms of vocal perception. The groundbreaking study, published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) on June 11, 2024, reveals a population of neurons in monkey brains that selectively respond to human voices.

Life Sciences - Health - 06.06.2024
Baby baboon brain anatomy predicts which hand they will use to communicate
Baby baboon brain anatomy predicts which hand they will use to communicate
By studying the brain anatomy of newborn baby baboons, a research group including several CNRS scientists 1 was able to predict what hand they would use to communicate after they had been weaned. These researchers had already found that nearly 70% of newborn baboons, like human babies, had early asymmetry in the planum temporale (PT) area of the brain.

Life Sciences - Health - 23.05.2024
Mechanobiology exerts creative pressure
Mechanobiology exerts creative pressure
Numerous cellular phenomena are guided by mechanical forces, such as embryonic development or the spread of metastases. These phenomena are the subject of intense research aimed at understanding how they are translated into biological processes. Particular emphasis is being placed on new opportunities to treat diseases as resistant as cancer or fibrosis.

Life Sciences - Pharmacology - 22.05.2024
Hallucinogenic mushrooms to treat alcohol addiction
Hallucinogenic mushrooms to treat alcohol addiction
A ground-breaking study conducted by INSERM's Groupe de Recherches sur l'Alcool et les Pharmacodépendances (GRAP) opens up new therapeutic perspectives for the treatment of alcohol addiction with psilocybin, the active compound in hallucinogenic mushrooms. Published in the scientific journal Brain , their work confirms the potential of psilocybin to combat alcohol addiction, while shedding light on the molecule's hitherto unknown mechanisms of action.

Life Sciences - Health - 07.05.2024
Vulnerability of the placenta to air pollution: what effects on the unborn child’s development?
How does exposure to air pollution affect the proper course of pregnancy and the development of the unborn child' A research team from Inserm and Université Grenoble Alpes investigated the potential effects on placental DNA of exposure to three major airborne pollutants. When comparing the data obtained from around 1 500 pregnant women, it observed that exposure to these pollutants during pregnancy was associated with epigenetic changes liable to alter the development of the foetus, particularly at the metabolic, immune and neurological levels.

Health - Life Sciences - 07.05.2024
Placental vulnerability to air pollution: what effects on the development of the unborn child?
Placental vulnerability to air pollution: what effects on the development of the unborn child?
How does exposure to air pollution during pregnancy affect the pregnancy and the development of the unborn child? A research team from Inserm and Grenoble Alpes University has investigated how placental DNA is modified by exposure to three major air pollutants. By comparing data obtained from almost 1,500 pregnant women, they were able to observe that exposure to these pollutants during pregnancy was associated with epigenetic modifications likely to alter fetal development, particularly at the metabolic, immune and neurological levels.

Health - Life Sciences - 06.05.2024
Discovery of a mechanism that allows Staphylococcus aureus to survive in blood
Staphylococcus aureus (golden staph) is one of the main causes of bacterial infection in France and throughout the world and is particularly responsible for nosocomial infections. Researchers from INRAE, the CEA and CNRS have discovered how this bacterium can survive in the hostile environment of blood.

Life Sciences - 01.05.2024
Cell contraction drive the initial shaping of human embryos
Cell contraction drive the initial shaping of human embryos
Human embryo compaction, an essential step in the first days of an embryo's development, is driven by the contractility of its cells. This is the finding of a team of scientists from CNRS, Institut Curie, Inserm, AP-HP and the Collège de France. Published in the 1 May edition of Nature, these results contradict the presupposed driving role of cell adhesion in this phenomenon and pave the way for improved assisted reproductive technology (ART) .

Life Sciences - 01.05.2024
Cell contraction drive the initial shaping of human embryos
Human embryo compaction, an essential step in the first days of an embryo's development, is driven by the contractility of its cells. This is the finding of a team of scientists from CNRS, Institut Curie, Inserm, AP-HP and the Collège de France. Published in the 1 May edition of Nature, these results contradict the presupposed driving role of cell adhesion in this phenomenon and pave the way for improved assisted reproductive technology (ART) .
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