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Life Sciences - Health - 04.06.2018
The search for the origin of mast cells
The search for the origin of mast cells
A team of researchers from CNRS, INSERM and Aix-Marseille Université (AMU) at the Centre of immunology (Marseille-Luminy (CIML), together with the Singapore Immunology Network (SIgN) 1 , has proven that not all of the immune system's important mast cells are produced in bone marrow, as was previously thought.

Life Sciences - Health - 31.05.2018
Bacteria ensure square meal for bloodsucking ticks
Bacteria ensure square meal for bloodsucking ticks
How do ticks live solely on blood? A study presented in Current Biology (May 31, 2018) has elucidated the crucial role played by symbiotic bacteria that synthesize B vitamins. These nutrients are scarcely found in the blood ticks ingest but are essential to their life cycle. Thus ticks cannot survive to adulthood or reproduce without their bacterial symbionts.

Life Sciences - 24.05.2018
A supergene to stay alive
A supergene to stay alive
Some butterflies rely mainly on colorful wing patterns for their survival. CNRS researchers from the Centre d'Écologie Fonctionnelle et Évolutive (CNRS / University of Montpellier / Paul-Valéry University / EPHE-PSL / IRD), together with British and American teams, studied the genomes of dozens of tropical Heliconius numata butterflies to understand how such diversity in color motifs has come about.

Life Sciences - Health - 02.05.2018
Why plants are so sensitive to gravity : The lowdown
Why plants are so sensitive to gravity : The lowdown
Plants can detect the slightest angle of inclination. Yet the mechanism by which they sense gravity relies on microscopic grains. In theory, such a system should hardly allow for precise detection of inclination. Researchers from the CNRS, the French National Institute of Agronomic Research (INRA), and Université Clermont Auvergne have now explained this curious paradox.

Life Sciences - History / Archeology - 30.04.2018
The rose genome deciphered: from the origin of modern roses to the characteristics of their blooms
The rose genome deciphered: from the origin of modern roses to the characteristics of their blooms
The rose: an ornamental plant emblematic of the cultural and economic history of mankind. An international consortium involving INRA, ENS de Lyon, CEA, CNRS and Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, has deciphered the genome of the rose. This work has enabled them to trace the respective contributions of European and Chinese roses to the genome of modern plants, and identify all the genes involved in the pathways for the biosynthesis of perfume and colour.

Life Sciences - Physics - 09.04.2018
ERC Advanced Grants : CNRS in the lead among European institutions
The European Research Council (ERC) has announced the recipients of its 2017 Advanced Grants, awarded to experienced male and female researchers well known in their fields.

Life Sciences - Health - 05.04.2018
Eating less enables lemurs to live longer
Eating less enables lemurs to live longer
Chronic caloric restriction strongly increases the lifespan of a small primate, the grey mouse lemur. This is one of the results of a ten-year experiment conducted by researchers at the CNRS and the French National Museum of Natural History (MNHN), in partnership with other French teams. 1 Chronic caloric restriction consists in eating a reduced but balanced diet from the outset of early adulthood.

Life Sciences - Health - 27.03.2018
BIABooster : a more sensitive device for characterizing DNA in blood circulation
BIABooster : a more sensitive device for characterizing DNA in blood circulation
Developed and patented 1 in 2012 and 2014 in the Laboratoire d'Analyse et d'Architecture des Systèmes (LAAS-CNRS) and implemented industrially by Picometrics-Technologies, BIABooster technology can characterize DNA with new precision and sensitivity. When used to analyze residual DNA circulating in the blood, it has identified promising signatures for monitoring patients with cancer.

Life Sciences - Health - 19.03.2018
How allergens trigger asthma attacks
How allergens trigger asthma attacks
A team of Inserm and CNRS researchers from the Institute of Pharmacology and Structural Biology—or IPBS (CNRS / Université Toulouse III—Paul Sabatier)—have identified a protein that acts like a sensor detecting various allergens in the respiratory tract responsible for asthma attacks.

Life Sciences - Health - 12.03.2018
A sobering conclusion: Adult hearts contain no stem cells
A sobering conclusion: Adult hearts contain no stem cells
Marie Bannier, a former normal student in the Biology Department at the ENS de Lyon, participated in the research and writing of this scientific publication as part of her 4th year. During a myocardial infarction, commonly known as a heart attack, the blood supply to part of the heart muscle is cut off.

Life Sciences - 22.02.2018
Unsaddling old theory on origin of horses
Unsaddling old theory on origin of horses
Botai horses were tamed in Kazakhstan 5,500 years ago and thought to be the ancestors of today's domesticated horses. . . until a team led by researchers from the CNRS and Université Toulouse III–Paul Sabatier sequenced their genome. Their findings published on 22 February 2018 in Science are startling: these equids are the progenitors not of the modern domesticated horse, but rather of Przewalski's horses—previously presumed wild! The earliest proof of equine domestication points to the steppes of Central Asia roughly 5,500 years ago.

Environment - Life Sciences - 01.02.2018
Press room
Press room
At a global scale, just 12 grape varieties (or 1% of cultivated varieties) occupy up to 80% of vineyards in some countries. Scientists from INRA and Harvard University in the USA have suggested that one of the levers that could be operated to adapt wine-growing to climate change is to exploit the diversity of other cultivated varieties by planting those that are less well known, and thus encouraging winegrowers and consumers to adopt new practices.

Health - Life Sciences - 30.01.2018
GlutN: understanding gluten sensitivity to offer suitable wheat-based products
GlutN: understanding gluten sensitivity to offer suitable wheat-based products
Coordinated by INRA, the GlutN Project aims to explore the mechanisms of non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS), assess its prevalence and identify clinical markers with the goal of developing suitable bread products. The GlutN Project was launched on 30 January 2018 in Paris. Found in the grains of numerous cereals, including wheat, gluten is a composite of proteins which gives flour the viscoelastic properties it needs to add shape to bread products.

Life Sciences - Environment - 25.01.2018
Tara Oceans : discovery of over 100 million genes from the marine world
Tara Oceans : discovery of over 100 million genes from the marine world
The Tara Oceans expedition (2009-2013) has enabled the collection of plankton samples in all of the world's oceans on board the schooner Tara , and the creation of catalogues of species and genes on a scale never before undertaken.

Life Sciences - 13.12.2017
Discovery of world's oldest plesiosaur
Discovery of world’s oldest plesiosaur
While dinosaurs reigned on dry land and in the sky, other reptiles populated the seas and oceans. Of the latter, plesiosaurs, whose means of locomotion may be described as “underwater flight,” formed the most diverse group. But when did they first appear? The discovery of the oldest of these reptiles provides evidence that they had diversified by the start of the Mesozoic Era, during the Triassic Period.

Earth Sciences - Life Sciences - 13.11.2017
World's longest sauropod dinosaur trackway brought to light
World’s longest sauropod dinosaur trackway brought to light
In 2009, the world's largest dinosaur tracks were discovered in the French village of Plagne, in the Jura Mountains. Since then, a series of excavations at the site has uncovered other tracks, sprawling over more than 150 meters. They form the longest sauropod trackway ever to be found.

Psychology - Life Sciences - 08.11.2017
Memory : recognizing images seen briefly ten years previously
Recalling the names of old classmates 50 years after graduation or of favorite childhood television series illustrates the amazing abilities of human memory. Emotion and repeated exposure are both known to play a role in long-term memorization, but why do we remember things that are not emotionally charged and have only been seen or experienced a few times in the past?

Health - Life Sciences - 03.11.2017
Antibiotics affect the efficacy of immunotherapy
A study published in the journal Science by a research team from Gustave Roussy, INSERM, INRA, AP-HP, IHU Médiaterranée Infections* and Paris-Sud University shows that prescribed antibiotics impair the efficacy of immunotherapy in cancer patients. It is important to consider that more than 20% of patients living with cancer receive antibiotics.

Life Sciences - History / Archeology - 02.11.2017
Genetic history : Searching for the African roots of Noir Marron communities
Genetic history : Searching for the African roots of Noir Marron communities
New genetic data bear witness to transatlantic ties severed by slavery and triangular trade. Scientists 1 from the Anthropologie Moléculaire et Imagerie de Synthèse (CNRS/Université Toulouse III - Paul Sabatier/Paris Descartes University) and Ecological Anthropology and Ethnobiology (CNRS/MNHN) research units have shown that members of Maroon communities in South America - formed over four centuries ago by Africans who escaped slavery - have remarkably preserved their African genetic heritage (98%).

Health - Life Sciences - 26.10.2017
Discovery of a potential therapeutic target to combat trypanosomes
Discovery of a potential therapeutic target to combat trypanosomes
Yaser Hashem's team at the Laboratoire Architecture et Réactivité de l'ARN at CNRS's has discovered a new potential therapeutic target – located in the ribosome – to combat trypanosomes parasites.

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