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Health - Life Sciences - 10.02.2017
Epstein-Barr virus and cancer: new tricks from an old dog
Almost everybody has it: Scientists estimate that approximately 95 percent of adults around the world are infected with the Epstein-Barr virus. In rare cases, an infection with this virus causes cancer. Scientists at the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), at the German Center for Infection Research (DZIF), and at the French National Institute of Health and Medical Research (Inserm) have now discovered that a component of the Epstein-Barr virus infectious particle promotes carcinogenesis.

Life Sciences - Health - 23.01.2017
New clue towards understanding why prion strain virulence varies depending on which cells are infected
New clue towards understanding why prion strain virulence varies depending on which cells are infected
Prion strains are more or less virulent depending on the population of cells they infect. The reason for these different virulence levels remains largely unknown. Researchers at INRA recently took a decisive step closer to explaining these variations. They observed that certain strains were favoured over others depending on the level of PrP protein, which forms the substrate of brain cells in mice.

Health - 20.01.2017
Food additive E171: first findings of oral exposure to titanium dioxide nanoparticles
Food additive E171: first findings of oral exposure to titanium dioxide nanoparticles
Researchers from INRA and their partners 1 have studied the effects of oral exposure to titanium dioxide, an additive (E171) commonly used in foodstuffs, especially confectionary. They have shown for the first time that E171 crosses the intestinal barrier in animals and reaches other parts of the body.

Life Sciences - Health - 17.01.2017
Microbiota: new insights on what happens to dietary fibre in the human gut
Microbiota: new insights on what happens to dietary fibre in the human gut
One of the major functions of our intestinal microbiota - which until recently was thought to reside only in the colon - is to break down dietary fibre (and namely complex polysaccharides). However, researchers from INRA working with CNRS 1 used metagenomic screening to reveal fibrolytic potential in the ileum section of the small intestine.

Health - Life Sciences - 14.01.2017
Ebola survivors: life afterwards
The long-term clinical and social sequelae following survival of Ebola infection are unknown.

Life Sciences - Health - 11.01.2017
Baboons produce vocalizations comparable to vowels
Baboons produce vocalizations comparable to vowels
Baboons produce vocalizations comparable to vowels. This is what has been demonstrated by an international team coordinated by researchers from the Gipsa-Lab (CNRS/Grenoble INP/Grenoble Alpes University), the Laboratory of Cognitive Psychology (CNRS/AMU), and the Laboratory of Anatomy at the University of Montpellier, using acoustic analyses of vocalizations coupled with an anatomical study of the tongue muscles and the modeling of the acoustic potential of the vocal tract in monkeys.

Life Sciences - Health - 10.01.2017
Identification of one of the keys allowing entry of Zika virus into brain cells
A team led by Ali Amara, Inserm Research Director at Unit 944, 'Pathology and Molecular Virology' (Inserm/CNRS/Paris Diderot University) describes, in an article published in Cell Reports , the mechanisms that allow Zika virus to infect the cells of the nervous system. The ZIKAlliance project, coordinated by Inserm and funded under the Horizon 2020 programme of the European Commission's Directorate-General for Research and Innovation, is aimed at characterising the fundamental and clinical aspects of infection by Zika virus, an emerging pathogen in America.

Health - Physics - 02.01.2017
Nanohyperthermia softens tumors to improve treatment
Nanohyperthermia softens tumors to improve treatment
The mechanical resistance of tumors and collateral damage of standard treatments often hinder efforts to defeat cancers.

Health - Environment - 26.12.2016
Divide and rule, or how plant diversity increases the sustainability of their resistance
Divide and rule, or how plant diversity increases the sustainability of their resistance
In the Yuanyang region of China where rice cultivation is a tradition, scientists from INRA and CIRAD, working in collaboration with a Chinese team, have focused on the defence mechanisms of rice against its pathogenic agents.

Health - Environment - 26.12.2016
Divide and rule, or how plant diversity enhances the sustainability of their resistance
Divide and rule, or how plant diversity enhances the sustainability of their resistance
In the Yuanyang region of China where rice cultivation is a tradition, scientists from INRA and CIRAD, working in collaboration with a Chinese team, have focused on the defence mechanisms of rice against its pathogenic agents.

Life Sciences - Health - 21.12.2016
Optical control of a neuroreceptor alleviates chronic pain
Optical control of a neuroreceptor alleviates chronic pain
Pain serves as a valuable warning signal, but when it becomes chronic, pain should be considered as a real disease.

Health - Life Sciences - 14.12.2016
Testosterone for nerve fibre repair
To protect against attack, the body uses natural repair processes. What is involved in the spontaneous regeneration of the myelin sheath surrounding nerve fibres' This is the question addressed by researchers in Unit 1195, 'Neuroprotective, Neuroregenerative and Remyelinating Small Molecules' (Inserm/Paris-Sud University).

Life Sciences - Health - 12.12.2016
Neurons paralyze us during REM sleep
Neurons paralyze us during REM sleep
During REM sleep, the brain inhibits the motor system, which makes the sleeper completely immobile. CNRS researchers working in the Centre de Recherche en Neurosciences de Lyon (CNRS/Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1/INSERM/Université Jean Monnet) have identified a population of neurons that is responsible for this transient muscle paralysis.

Health - Life Sciences - 01.12.2016
A molecule to regenerate insulin-producing cells in type 1 diabetic patients
Inserm researchers led by Patrick Collombat at Unit 1091,'Institute of Biology Valrose' (Inserm/CNRS/Nice Sophia Antipolis University), show that GABA, a neurotransmitter that is sometimes used as a dietary supplement, can induce the regeneration of insulin-producing cells. This discovery, confirmed in mice and partially validated in humans, gives new hope to patients with type 1 diabetes.

Life Sciences - Health - 24.11.2016
Intestinal cells stave off bacteria by purging
Intestinal cells stave off bacteria by purging
Though purging is not prescribed as often as it was centuries ago, intestinal cells known as enterocytes frequently resort to this age-old remedy. Researchers from the Immune Response and Development in Insects (CNRS), Molecular Immunorheumatology (INSERM / Université de Strasbourg), and PAM Food Science and Microbiological Processes (AgroSup Dijon / Université de Bourgogne) laboratories have demonstrated that enterocytes attacked by pathogenic bacteria rapidly purge themselves of most of their contents.

Life Sciences - Health - 22.11.2016
The cause of uncombable hair syndrome identified
In 1973, the rare syndrome of uncombable hair or - pili trianguli et canaliculi - was described by a Toulouse dermatologist. More than 40 years later, Michel Simon, Inserm research director his colleagues at the 'Epidermal Differentiation and Rheumatoid Autoimmunity' Unit [UDEAR] (Inserm/CNRS/Toulouse III - Paul Sabatier University) have identified its genetic cause.

Health - Life Sciences - 21.11.2016
Functional human intestine grown from stem cells
American researchers at the Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center and French researchers from Inserm (joint research Unit 913 'Neuropathies of Enteric Nervous System and Digestive Diseases', Nantes) have succeeded in generating a functional human intestine using pluripotent human stem cells.

Life Sciences - Health - 21.11.2016
Mitochondria are essential to memory
Numerous studies have shown that using cannabis can lead to shortand long-term memory loss. These effects on memory may be related to the presence of specific receptors on several types of brain cells (glial cells as well as neurons). Inserm researchers led by Giovanni Marsicano (Neurocentre Magendie, U1215) have shown that these effects on memory are related to the presence of these same receptors on the mitochondria, the energy centre of the cell.

Health - Agronomy / Food Science - 17.11.2016
Nutritional prevention a possible method to limit risk of cancers linked to iron in meat products
Nutritional prevention a possible method to limit risk of cancers linked to iron in meat products
Recent data suggests that the consumption of nutritional iron could be linked to a high risk of breast cancer, and a diet rich in antioxidants appears to be effective at limiting this risk. Such are the findings of a study led by INRA and INSERM 1 researchers, published in the journal Oncotarget . These new results confirm those found in animals AND findings on colon cancer.

Physics - Health - 03.11.2016
France doubles its experimental capability in nuclear physics
France doubles its experimental capability in nuclear physics
The new SPIRAL2 particle accelerator at the French large heavy-ion accelerator GANIL (CNRS/CEA), inaugurated on November 3 in the presence of the French President François Hollande, will be able to p
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