Neanderthals: Pioneers in the use of marine resources

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Marine ressources from Figueira Brava. A. limpets, B. clams, C. crab, D. dolphin

Marine ressources from Figueira Brava. A. limpets, B. clams, C. crab, D. dolphin vertebrae, E. shark vertebrae © A-C M. Nabais, D Antunes et al. 2000, E. J. P. Ruas

Neanderthals slurping seashells by the seashore? This scene may startle those accustomed to imagining Homo neanderthalensis as a people of cold climes who hunted large herbivores. Yet an international team including scientists from three laboratories affiliated with the CNRS and partner institutions 1 have just demonstrated that Neanderthals hunted, fished, and gathered prodigious volumes of seafood and other marine animals: they discovered remains of molluscs, crustaceans, fish, birds, and mammals in a Portuguese cave (Figueira Brava) occupied by Neanderthals between 106,000 and 86,000 BCE. The diversity of marine food resources found there even exceeds that observed at other, much more recent Portuguese sites, dated to 9,000-7,500 BCE. The team’s findings suggest that many Neanderthal groups-living in Mediterranean climates far from the mammoth hunts of the frigid steppes-shared these dietary habitats.


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