news 2015

History - Jan 15
History
Researchers from the CNRS, Sorbonne Université, université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne, the Muséum National d'Histoire Naturelle and the Musée du Quai Branly - Jacques Chirac have shown colours formerly painted on the Pachacamac idol, a 15th century Inca God and oracle. Paired with the first carbon 14 dating of the object, these results published in PLOS ONE on 15 January 2020 shed light on colour practices, and how important they were in the Andes at that time.
Astronomy - Jan 9
Astronomy

The small red planet is losing water more quickly than what theory as well as past observations would suggest.

Life Sciences - Dec 20, 2019
Life Sciences

Axons, the threadlike part of a nerve cell that conducts impulses, are both flexible and strong, which makes them a mystery in the eyes of biologists.

Pedagogy - Jan 8
Pedagogy

As early as 4 years old, children associate power and masculinity, even in countries considered to be more egalitarian like Norway.

Earth Sciences - Dec 18, 2019
Earth Sciences

Scientists have for the first time shown that it is possible to detect the propagation of seismic waves on the seafloor using submarine telecommunications cables.


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Chemistry - Physics - 09.10.2015
Designing better catalysts using simple chemical concepts
Designing better catalysts using simple chemical concepts
Catalytic nanoparticles contain various sites: for instance, the sites C (center of a hexagonal facet; nine neighbors marked in yellow), E (edge between two hexagonal facets; seven neighbors in green) and K (kink, at the corner between three facets; six neighbors in purple). Atoms at edges and terraces appear in light and dark blue, respectively.

Computer Science / Telecom - Electroengineering - 03.06.2015
UPMC Robotics on the Cover of Nature magazine
UPMC Robotics on the Cover of Nature magazine
Researchers at the Intelligent Systems and Robotics Institute (ISIR, a joint UPMC/CNRS structure) and colleagues from the University of Lorraine* are the cover story in Nature. Their work, published in the May 27, 2015 issue, show how robots can automatically adapt in less than two minutes when they have been damaged.

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