news 2016

Health - Jun 12
A French consortium led by INRA, in collaboration with INSERM, the Universities of Lyon and Clermont Auvergne, Lyon Civil Hospitals and the Human Nutrition Research Centres (CRNH) of Rhône-Alpes and Auvergne, have now demonstrated that consuming certain lipids present naturally in dairy products (called "polar lipids") could reduce the cardiovascular risk in overweight postmenopausal women by lowering their blood levels of LDL-cholesterol ("bad" cholesterol) and triglycerides.
Life Sciences - Jun 11
Life Sciences

Which grape varieties were popular for making wine in ancient times' Do they resemble those in use today? An international consortium which included INRA, the CNRS and the University of Montpellier1 has shed new light on viticulture in ancient Rome and the Middle Ages.

Health - Jun 5
Health

In an article published May 30, 2019 in the British Medical Journal , researchers from Inserm, Inra, Université Paris 13 and Cnam in the Nutritional Epidemiology Research Team (EREN) report an incr

Life Sciences - Jun 11
Life Sciences

Researchers at INRA, ANSES, and ENVA have discovered that bluetongue virus can enhance its replication by exploiting one of its host's cellular pathways.

Innovation - May 22
Innovation

First patents to cover the fundamental processes for accessing the human gut microbiome as biotherapeutics.


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Health - Environment - 26.12.2016
Divide and rule, or how plant diversity increases the sustainability of their resistance
Divide and rule, or how plant diversity increases the sustainability of their resistance
In the Yuanyang region of China where rice cultivation is a tradition, scientists from INRA and CIRAD, working in collaboration with a Chinese team, have focused on the defence mechanisms of rice against its pathogenic agents.

Health - Environment - 26.12.2016
Divide and rule, or how plant diversity enhances the sustainability of their resistance
Divide and rule, or how plant diversity enhances the sustainability of their resistance
In the Yuanyang region of China where rice cultivation is a tradition, scientists from INRA and CIRAD, working in collaboration with a Chinese team, have focused on the defence mechanisms of rice against its pathogenic agents.

Chemistry - Life Sciences - 21.12.2016
Light-induced vesicle explosions to mimic cellular reactions
Light-induced vesicle explosions to mimic cellular reactions
Cells are the site of a multitude of chemical reactions, the precision of which is envied by scientists.

Chemistry - Physics - 21.12.2016
Materials: when defects turn into qualities
Materials: when defects turn into qualities
Hybrid organic-inorganic materials, which were developed approximately twenty years ago – notably by Gérard Férey, laureate of the CNRS 2010 Gold Medal, and his team – are known firstly for their extreme porosity. This remarkable property offers a diverse range of applications in the fields of energy, health, and sustainable development.

Life Sciences - Health - 21.12.2016
Optical control of a neuroreceptor alleviates chronic pain
Optical control of a neuroreceptor alleviates chronic pain
Pain serves as a valuable warning signal, but when it becomes chronic, pain should be considered as a real disease.

Life Sciences - Environment - 21.12.2016
The blob can learn—and teach!
The blob can learn—and teach!
It isn't an animal, a plant, or a fungus. The slime mold ( Physarum polycephalum ) is a strange, creeping, bloblike organism made up of one giant cell. Though it has no brain, it can learn from experience, as biologists at the Research Centre on Animal Cognition (CNRS, Université Toulouse III—Paul Sabatier) previously demonstrated.

Life Sciences - 20.12.2016
A double agent to fight hepatitis C
A double agent to fight hepatitis C
Immunostaining of three proteins (in blue, red and green) from hepatitis C virus that replicates within the cytoplasm of an infected cell.

Physics - 19.12.2016
Stretching time to improve extreme event prediction
Stretching time to improve extreme event prediction
Stretching time scales to explore extreme events in nature seemed impossible, yet this feat is now conceivable thanks to a team from the Institut FEMTO-ST (CNRS/UFC/UTBM/ENSMM), which used an innovative measurement technique enabling the capture of such events in real time. This technique, which is currently applied in the field of photonics, could help predict rogue wave events 1 on the ocean surface, along with other extreme natural phenomena.

Life Sciences - Business / Economics - 16.12.2016
Conflicts of interest and publications on GM Bt crops
Three INRA researchers have analyzed the scientific literature on the efficacy or durability of Bt transgenic plants in terms of the possible link of interest between this research and the biotechnology industries. They publish their results in the journal PLOS ONE of 15 December 2016. They show that 40% of the publications studied present a financial conflict of interest 1 .

Health - Life Sciences - 14.12.2016
Testosterone for nerve fibre repair
To protect against attack, the body uses natural repair processes. What is involved in the spontaneous regeneration of the myelin sheath surrounding nerve fibres' This is the question addressed by researchers in Unit 1195, ‘Neuroprotective, Neuroregenerative and Remyelinating Small Molecules' (Inserm/Paris-Sud University).

Life Sciences - Health - 12.12.2016
Neurons paralyze us during REM sleep
Neurons paralyze us during REM sleep
During REM sleep, the brain inhibits the motor system, which makes the sleeper completely immobile. CNRS researchers working in the Centre de Recherche en Neurosciences de Lyon (CNRS/Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1/INSERM/Université Jean Monnet) have identified a population of neurons that is responsible for this transient muscle paralysis.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 12.12.2016
Atmospheric methane concentrations are rising faster since 2007
An international group of researchers led by LSCE (CEA-CNRS-UVSQ) has published a thorough budget of methane sources and sinks 1 over the last decade in the Earth System Science Data (ESSD) journal,

Astronomy / Space Science - Life Sciences - 02.12.2016
Minimum effort for maximum effect
Ten days after astronaut Thomas Pesquet take-off into space on the Proxima mission, many questions remain about human adaptation to gravity. The research team at Inserm Unit 1093, ‘Cognition, Motor Activity and Sensorimotor Plasticity' (Inserm/Université de Bourgogne), focuses on the manner in which movements that depend on this parameter are performed.

Health - Life Sciences - 01.12.2016
A molecule to regenerate insulin-producing cells in type 1 diabetic patients
Inserm researchers led by Patrick Collombat at Unit 1091,‘Institute of Biology Valrose' (Inserm/CNRS/Nice Sophia Antipolis University), show that GABA, a neurotransmitter that is sometimes used as a dietary supplement, can induce the regeneration of insulin-producing cells. This discovery, confirmed in mice and partially validated in humans, gives new hope to patients with type 1 diabetes.

Earth Sciences - Physics - 28.11.2016
Marine sediments record variations in the Earth's magnetic field
Marine sediments record variations in the Earth’s magnetic field
Past variations in the strength of the Earth's magnetic field are reflected by the production of isotopes in the atmosphere.

Earth Sciences - Mathematics - 25.11.2016
Subduction zone geometry: a mega-earthquake risk indicator
Subduction zone geometry: a mega-earthquake risk indicator
Mega-earthquakes (with a magnitude greater than 8.5) mainly occur on subduction faults where one tectonic plate passes under another. But the probability of such earthquakes does not appear to be even across these zones. In a study published on 25 November 2016 in the journal Science , researchers from the University of Oregon and Géoazur laboratory (CNRS/Université Nice Sophia Antipolis/Observatoire de la Côte d'Azur/IRD) show that mega-earthquakes mostly occur on the flattest subduction zones.

Life Sciences - Health - 24.11.2016
Intestinal cells stave off bacteria by purging
Intestinal cells stave off bacteria by purging
Though purging is not prescribed as often as it was centuries ago, intestinal cells known as enterocytes frequently resort to this age-old remedy. Researchers from the Immune Response and Development in Insects (CNRS), Molecular Immunorheumatology (INSERM / Université de Strasbourg), and PAM Food Science and Microbiological Processes (AgroSup Dijon / Université de Bourgogne) laboratories have demonstrated that enterocytes attacked by pathogenic bacteria rapidly purge themselves of most of their contents.

Life Sciences - Health - 22.11.2016
The cause of uncombable hair syndrome identified
In 1973, the rare syndrome of uncombable hair or - pili trianguli et canaliculi - was described by a Toulouse dermatologist. More than 40 years later, Michel Simon, Inserm research director his colleagues at the ‘Epidermal Differentiation and Rheumatoid Autoimmunity' Unit [UDEAR] (Inserm/CNRS/Toulouse III - Paul Sabatier University) have identified its genetic cause.

Life Sciences - Health - 21.11.2016
Mitochondria are essential to memory
Numerous studies have shown that using cannabis can lead to shortand long-term memory loss. These effects on memory may be related to the presence of specific receptors on several types of brain cells (glial cells as well as neurons). Inserm researchers led by Giovanni Marsicano (Neurocentre Magendie, U1215) have shown that these effects on memory are related to the presence of these same receptors on the mitochondria, the energy centre of the cell.

Health - Life Sciences - 21.11.2016
Functional human intestine grown from stem cells
American researchers at the Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center and French researchers from Inserm (joint research Unit 913 ‘Neuropathies of Enteric Nervous System and Digestive Diseases', Nantes) have succeeded in generating a functional human intestine using pluripotent human stem cells.
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