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Life Sciences - Health - 25.05.2022
Women-specific mechanisms may contribute to tumor progression
Women-specific mechanisms may contribute to tumor progression
Researchers have demonstrated the role of a non-coding RNA in the development of aggressive tumors, particularly in breast cancer. The study, conducted in collaboration between the Institut Curie, Inserm, CNRS, Institut Paoli Calmettes and Aix-Marseille University , has just been published in the journal Cell .

Chemistry - 24.05.2022
Toward new degradable polymers
Toward new degradable polymers
Vinyl polymers, commonly referred to as "plastics," are ubiquitous materials. They are extremely interesting for their ease of synthesis and their great diversity in terms of architecture and functionality.

Health - Life Sciences - 17.05.2022
Phage Therapy: A Model to Predict Its Efficacy against Pathogenic Bacteria
Phage Therapy: A Model to Predict Its Efficacy against Pathogenic Bacteria
Antibiotic resistance represents a major public health challenge, associated with a high mortality rate. While bacteriophages - viruses that kill bacteria - could be a solution for fighting antibiotic-resistant pathogens, various obstacles stand in the way of their clinical development.

Astronomy / Space Science - 12.05.2022
First image of the black hole at the heart of our galaxy
First image of the black hole at the heart of our galaxy
Within the EHT collaboration, the CNRS and IRAM participated in the creation of a first image of the black hole Sagittarius A*. Astronomers have unveiled the first image of the supermassive black hole at the centre of our own Milky Way galaxy. This result provides overwhelming evidence that the object is indeed a black hole and yields valuable clues about the workings of such giants, which are thought to reside at the centre of most galaxies.

Life Sciences - Health - 10.05.2022
Healthy cells can impact tumour progression during embryonic development
Healthy cells can impact tumour progression during embryonic development
Half of childhood cancers arise during the development of the human embryo, which greatly complicates research into these diseases. The team of Valérie Castellani, CNRS senior researcher at the Mechanisms in Integrated Life Sciences (MeLiS) laboratory (CNRS / INSERM / Claude Bernard Lyon 1 University) has thus developed a model that optimally simulates the human embryonic environment by grafting human cancer cells into a chick embryo.

Health - Pharmacology - 04.05.2022
Influenza: A New Avenue for Developing Innovative Treatments
Influenza: A New Avenue for Developing Innovative Treatments
Seasonal influenza is a major public health issue because it continues to remain associated with considerable mortality, particularly among people who are elderly, immunocompromised, or both. It also has a significant socioeconomic cost. With vaccination and current treatments still being of limited efficacy, research teams are trying to develop new therapeutic approaches.

Life Sciences - Social Sciences - 02.05.2022
A link between social network size and brain structure?
A link between social network size and brain structure?
The more social relationships we have, the more certain structures in our brain are developed. This has been the hypothesis of various neuroscience research projects for several years. With previous findings having highlighted the role of our social environment as one of the key factors behind the expansion of the cerebral cortex, researchers from Inserm and Université Lyon Claude Bernard Lyon 1, in collaboration with the University of Pennsylvania, went one step further in elucidating this link.

Astronomy / Space Science - 28.04.2022
Discovery of 30 exocomets in a young planetary system
Discovery of 30 exocomets in a young planetary system
For the past thirty years, the star - Pictoris has fascinated astronomers because it enables them to observe a planetary system in the process of formation. It is made up of at least two young planets, and also contains comets, which were detected as early as 1987. These were the first comets ever observed around a star other than the Sun.

Life Sciences - 21.04.2022
Dynamic finite-element simulations reveal early origin of complex human birth pattern
Dynamic finite-element simulations reveal early origin of complex human birth pattern
An interdisciplinary and international research team realized the first 4-dimensional simulation of hominin birth, constituting an important methodological advance for paleo-obstetrics. The researchers found that australopithecines gave birth to relatively small brained newborns, implying that they were helpless at birth similar to modern humans and their mothers thus needed the help of group members.

Health - Pharmacology - 20.04.2022
Infertility: New Avenues to Understand the Harmful Effects of Chemotherapy
Infertility: New Avenues to Understand the Harmful Effects of Chemotherapy
Infertility is a public health problem affecting millions of couples in France. Among the possible causes, chemotherapy has been singled out as having particularly harmful effects on the fertility of both women and men. In order to better prevent and restore fertility in cancer survivors, understanding the mechanisms behind these negative effects is a priority.

Life Sciences - Health - 15.04.2022
Decoding a direct dialog between the gut microbiota and the brain
Decoding a direct dialog between the gut microbiota and the brain
Gut microbiota by-products circulate in the bloodstream, regulating host physiological processes including immunity, metabolism and brain functions. Scientists from the Institut Pasteur (a partner research organization of Université Paris Cité), Inserm and the CNRS have discovered that hypothalamic neurons in an animal model directly detect variations in bacterial activity and adapt appetite and body temperature accordingly.

Health - Life Sciences - 14.04.2022
Colon cancer: how mutation of the APC gene disrupts lymphocyte migration
Migrating human T lymphocytes revealing a broad protrusion at the leading edge and long adhesive protrusions at the rear. Image obtained by confocal fluorescence microscopy: filamentous actin, pink; VLA4 adhesion protein, blue. Institut Pasteur/Lymphocyte Cell Biology. Image by Marta Mastrogiovanni In patients with familial adenomatous polyposis, a genetic disease predisposing to colon cancer, mutations of the APC gene induce the formation of intestinal polyps, but also reduce immune system activity.

Health - Social Sciences - 13.04.2022
Long COVID: When Symptoms Persist Months after the First Wave
Long COVID: When Symptoms Persist Months after the First Wave
Several months after infection with SARS-CoV-2, some patients are still having symptoms - a phenomenon known as "long COVID” or "post-COVID-19 condition”. Still poorly understood, scientists are now attentively studying long COVID in order to improve knowledge and offer patients the best possible treatment.

Health - Pharmacology - 12.04.2022
HIV: The Antibodies of 'Post-treatment Controllers'
HIV: The Antibodies of ’Post-treatment Controllers’
A very small percentage of people with HIV-1, known as "post-treatment controllers” (PTCs), are able to control their infection after interrupting all antiretroviral therapy. Understanding the fundamental mechanisms that govern their immune response is essential in order to develop HIV-1 vaccines, novel therapeutic strategies to achieve remission, or both.

Life Sciences - Pharmacology - 11.04.2022
Epigenetic treatments: New allies for chemotherapies?
If genetics is interested in gene sequencing, epigenetics studies how genes are going to be used, or not used, by a cell. The epigenome of a cell represents the set of chemical modifications of the DNA or associated proteins that will determine the expression of the genes and thus the cell's identity.

Astronomy / Space Science - Earth Sciences - 01.04.2022
Perseverance records the first ever sounds from Mars
Perseverance records the first ever sounds from Mars
Using a microphone developed in France, the Perseverance rover has recorded the first ever sounds from Mars audible to the human ear. By analysing these sounds, scientists have been able to find out more about the physical characteristics of the Martian atmosphere, and in particular about the speed of sound and its attenuation there.

Health - Agronomy / Food Science - 24.03.2022
Artificial Sweeteners: Possible Link to Increased Cancer Risk
Artificial Sweeteners: Possible Link to Increased Cancer Risk
Artificial sweeteners are used to reduce the amounts of added sugar in foods and beverages, thereby maintaining sweetness without the extra calories. These products, such as diet sodas, yoghurts and sweetener tablets for drinks, are consumed by millions of people daily. However, the safety of these additives is the subject of debate.

Pharmacology - Health - 24.03.2022
Increased Ischemic Stroke Risk Associated with Certain Medications for Nausea and Vomiting
Every year in France, 140,000 people have a stroke 1 . Around 80% are ischemic strokes or cerebral infarctions, which occur when a brain artery is obstructed by a blood clot. Studies have shown that the risk of ischemic stroke is increased by the use of antipsychotics: medications with antidopaminergic 2 properties that are commonly prescribed in psychiatry.

Health - Pharmacology - 21.03.2022
COVID-19: 'Reactive' Vaccination, Effective in Case of High Viral Circulation?
COVID-19: ’Reactive’ Vaccination, Effective in Case of High Viral Circulation?
Although the majority of its population is fully vaccinated, the virus continues to actively circulate in France. As health restrictions are being lifted, fears of a resurgence of the epidemic and of the emergence of new more contagious variants are leading scientists to consider new strategies to continue to promote vaccination among populations that remain hesitant.

Life Sciences - Health - 16.03.2022
Discovery of an immune escape mechanism promoting Listeria infection of the central nervous system
Discovery of an immune escape mechanism promoting Listeria infection of the central nervous system
Some "hypervirulent" strains of Listeria monocytogenes have a greater capacity to infect the central nervous system. Scientists from the Institut Pasteur, Université Paris Cité, Inserm and the Paris Public Hospital Network (AP-HP) have discovered a mechanism that enables cells infected with Listeria monocytogenes to escape immune responses.
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