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Life Sciences - Pharmacology - 22.05.2024
Hallucinogenic mushrooms to treat alcohol addiction
Hallucinogenic mushrooms to treat alcohol addiction
A ground-breaking study conducted by INSERM's Groupe de Recherches sur l'Alcool et les Pharmacodépendances (GRAP) opens up new therapeutic perspectives for the treatment of alcohol addiction with psilocybin, the active compound in hallucinogenic mushrooms. Published in the scientific journal Brain , their work confirms the potential of psilocybin to combat alcohol addiction, while shedding light on the molecule's hitherto unknown mechanisms of action.

Life Sciences - Health - 07.05.2024
Vulnerability of the placenta to air pollution: what effects on the unborn child’s development?
How does exposure to air pollution affect the proper course of pregnancy and the development of the unborn child' A research team from Inserm and Université Grenoble Alpes investigated the potential effects on placental DNA of exposure to three major airborne pollutants. When comparing the data obtained from around 1 500 pregnant women, it observed that exposure to these pollutants during pregnancy was associated with epigenetic changes liable to alter the development of the foetus, particularly at the metabolic, immune and neurological levels.

Health - Life Sciences - 07.05.2024
Placental vulnerability to air pollution: what effects on the development of the unborn child?
Placental vulnerability to air pollution: what effects on the development of the unborn child?
How does exposure to air pollution during pregnancy affect the pregnancy and the development of the unborn child? A research team from Inserm and Grenoble Alpes University has investigated how placental DNA is modified by exposure to three major air pollutants. By comparing data obtained from almost 1,500 pregnant women, they were able to observe that exposure to these pollutants during pregnancy was associated with epigenetic modifications likely to alter fetal development, particularly at the metabolic, immune and neurological levels.

Health - Life Sciences - 06.05.2024
Discovery of a mechanism that allows Staphylococcus aureus to survive in blood
Staphylococcus aureus (golden staph) is one of the main causes of bacterial infection in France and throughout the world and is particularly responsible for nosocomial infections. Researchers from INRAE, the CEA and CNRS have discovered how this bacterium can survive in the hostile environment of blood.

Life Sciences - 01.05.2024
Cell contraction drive the initial shaping of human embryos
Cell contraction drive the initial shaping of human embryos
Human embryo compaction, an essential step in the first days of an embryo's development, is driven by the contractility of its cells. This is the finding of a team of scientists from CNRS, Institut Curie, Inserm, AP-HP and the Collège de France. Published in the 1 May edition of Nature, these results contradict the presupposed driving role of cell adhesion in this phenomenon and pave the way for improved assisted reproductive technology (ART) .

Life Sciences - 01.05.2024
Cell contraction drive the initial shaping of human embryos
Human embryo compaction, an essential step in the first days of an embryo's development, is driven by the contractility of its cells. This is the finding of a team of scientists from CNRS, Institut Curie, Inserm, AP-HP and the Collège de France. Published in the 1 May edition of Nature, these results contradict the presupposed driving role of cell adhesion in this phenomenon and pave the way for improved assisted reproductive technology (ART) .

Life Sciences - Health - 24.04.2024
Discovering cancers of epigenetic origin without DNA mutation
Discovering cancers of epigenetic origin without DNA mutation
A research team including scientists from the CNRS 1 has discovered that cancer, one of the leading causes of death worldwide, can be caused entirely by epigenetic changes 2 , in other words, changes that contribute to how gene expression is regulated, and partly explain why, despite an identical genome, an individual develops very different cells (neurons, skin cells, etc.

Life Sciences - 18.04.2024
Axons follow a signposted path to reach their muscular target
Publication of the IGFL in the journal PNAS on March 19, 2024. News by CNRS Biology on April 12, 2024. During embryonic development, motor neurons, located in the spinal cord, emit extensions - the axons - which must find their way to their targets - the muscle cells. These motoneurons, last link between electrical and mechanical signals in the locomotor system, trigger movement via their axons.

Life Sciences - Health - 14.04.2024
Muting tinnitus
Research on tinnitus, a recent investigative field, is now enabling a clearer understanding of the causes and effects of this symptom that affects nearly eight million people in France. Buzzing, hissing, creaking, ringing, clicking or humming; according to a recent French study, although 23 million French people over the age of 15 have experienced tinnitus once in their lives, between four and seven million of them suffer from it on a permanent basis.

Life Sciences - 10.04.2024
Menstrual cycle regularity: a biological clock driven by the moon?
Because of their cyclical rhythm and similar durations, the menstrual and lunar cycles have often been assumed to be linked, despite no solid evidence so far to support this. To gain a better understanding of the origin of the rhythmic regularity of the menstrual cycle, an international research team involving Inserm, CNRS and Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1 compared a large amount of data on cycles collected from studies conducted in Europe and North America.

Life Sciences - 10.04.2024
Under the watchful eye of scientists, viruses become the muses of therapeutic innovation.
Under the watchful eye of scientists, viruses become the muses of therapeutic innovation.
Work by a consortium of scientists, including a team from the Centre International de Recherche en Infectiologie (CIRI, CNRS/Inserm/ENS de Lyon/Université Lyon 1), describes viruses as modulators of human cell functions. The interaction interfaces of viral proteins with human proteins are used as matrices to design original chemical molecules, offering new perspectives in multiple therapeutic areas.

Life Sciences - 09.04.2024
Surprising role of female sex pheromone in crop pest: new biocontrol possibilities?
INRAE researchers have discovered that female pheromones play a remarkable role in the African cotton moth. In general, these pheromones trigger mate attraction, promoting encounters between males and females during reproductive periods. Astonishingly, the African cotton moth possesses a pheromonal compound whose modulatory effects exceed those of light itself, a discovery that can inform future biocontrol strategies.

Life Sciences - Health - 14.03.2024
Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: a new avenue for improving patient diagnosis and follow-up
Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: a new avenue for improving patient diagnosis and follow-up
Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis or Charcot's disease is a neurodegenerative disease that results in progressive paralysis and subsequent death. Diagnosing it is difficult and no curative treatment exists to date, making these challenges for research. In a new study, Inserm researcher Caroline Rouaux and her team at the Strasbourg Biomedical Research Centre (Inserm-Université de Strasbourg), in collaboration with researchers from Ludwig Maximilian University in Munich, CNRS and Sorbonne Université, show that electroencephalography could become a diagnostic and prognostic tool for the disease.

Life Sciences - Music - 06.03.2024
The brain mechanisms behind our desire to dance
Why does some music make us want to dance more than others? This is the question that a research team from Inserm and Aix-Marseille Université tried to answer by studying the desire to dance (also called the 'groove') and the brain activity of 30 participants who were asked to listen to music. Their findings show that the groove sensation is highest for a moderately complex rhythm and that the desire to move is reflected in the brain by an anticipation of the music's rhythm.

Life Sciences - Environment - 29.02.2024
Unveiling rare diversity: the origin of heritable mutations in trees
What is the origin of genetic diversity in plants? Can new mutations acquired during growth be passed on to seeds? INRAE scientists, in collaboration with CIRAD and the CNRS, have used the French Guiana forest as the setting for their research, leading to a series of discoveries on this fundamental question in biology.

Health - Life Sciences - 29.02.2024
COVID-19: A potential treatment for loss of smell
One of the most persistent and debilitating symptoms of COVID19 is anosmia or loss of smell. Researchers at INRAE and ENVA have discovered that a corticoid treatment could help restore the olfactory capacities affected by the viral infection. These results, published on XX February in Brain, Behavior, and Immunity, are a major step forward in understanding and treating this symptom.

Health - Life Sciences - 26.02.2024
New discovery on iron metabolism improves anemia treatment
Anemia is a major public health problem worldwide, affecting around a third of the population. There are many causes of anemia, but the most common are a defect in the production of red blood cells, a lack of iron in the blood or genetic diseases such as thalassemia. A better understanding of iron metabolism is essential to improve management of the many patients affected.

Health - Life Sciences - 26.02.2024
Improving the treatment of anaemia thanks to a new discovery in iron metabolism
An essential component of the haemoglobin in red blood cells, iron is crucial to many biological processes - including the transport and storage of oxygen in the body. © Inserm/Claude Féo Anaemia is a major public health problem worldwide, affecting around one third of the population. Its causes are multiple, but the most common are a lack of red blood cell production, a lack of iron in the blood, and genetic diseases such as thalassaemia.

Life Sciences - 21.02.2024
Food additive E551 could promote coeliac disease
A recent study has found that food additive E551, also known as silicon dioxide, can reduce oral tolerance to dietary proteins and could foster the development of coeliac disease. Born of a collaboration among researchers at INRAE and McMaster University in Canada, this pioneering work is the first to highlight the potential toxicity of E551, a nanometric ingredient that is added to a wide range of consumer food products.

Health - Life Sciences - 20.02.2024
Obesity: opt for omega 3 fatty acids to prevent the associated risks
In yellow, microglia (immune cells of the brain) activated by the pro-inflammatory nature of a sunflower oil-enriched diet (fluorescence microscopy). Clara Sanchez/Inserm Obesity is a major public health problem, affecting around 650 million adults worldwide , and is often associated with systemic and cerebral inflammation as well as anxiety and cognitive disorders, such as memory deficits.
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