news 2020

Materials Science - May 5
Materials Science
The discovery of the earliest human burial site yet found in Africa, by an international team including several CNRS researchers 1 , has just been announced in the journal Nature . At Panga ya Saidi, in Kenya, north of Mombasa, the body of a three-year-old, dubbed Mtoto (Swahili for 'child') by the researchers, was deposited and buried in an excavated pit approximately 78,000 years ago.
Chemistry - Apr 27

Publication of CRMN in the journal PNAS on January 5, 2021. Neurodegenerative disorders are frequently associated with -sheet-rich amyloid deposits. Amyloid-forming proteins can aggregate under different structural conformations known as strains, which can exhibit a prion-like behavior and distinct pathophenotypes.

Art and Design - Apr 15
Art and Design

" It is machination, it is deception ," said the Director General of the Berlin Royal Museums in his defence when criticized for buying a fake.

Environment - Apr 26
Environment

The Chauvet Cave, which lies by the entrance to the Gorges of the Ardèche, is home to the world's oldest cave paintings, dating back 36,000 years.

Health - Apr 13
Health

Lensless Imaging System Affirms Phage Therapy's Value in Treating Serious Infection, Tracks Phage Resistance and Could Easily Be Implemented in Compact Devices at Phage Labs.


Category

Years
2021 | 2020 | 2019 | 2018 | 2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013



Results 1 - 20 of 78.
1 2 3 4 Next »


Life Sciences - 29.12.2020
A single gene 'invented' haemoglobin several times
A single gene ’invented’ haemoglobin several times
Thanks to the marine worm Platynereis dumerilii , an animal whose genes have evolved very slowly, scientists from CNRS, Université de Paris and Sorbonne Université, in association with others at the University of Saint Petersburg and the University of Rio de Janeiro, have shown that while haemoglobin appeared independently in several species, it actually descends from a single gene transmitted to all by their last common ancestor.

Life Sciences - 29.12.2020
A single gene 'invented' haemoglobin several times
A single gene ’invented’ haemoglobin several times
Thanks to the marine worm Platynereis dumerilii , an animal whose genes have evolved very slowly, scientists from CNRS, Université de Paris and Sorbonne Université, in association with others at the University of Saint Petersburg and the University of Rio de Janeiro, have shown that while haemoglobin appeared independently in several species, it actually descends from a single gene transmitted to all by their last common ancestor.

Computer Science - 18.12.2020
Scientists Present In-Memory Computing Pathways for Edge-AI & Neural Networks with 3D Architectures & Resistive-RAM
Papers at IEDM 2020 Explore Ways to Leverage 3D Technology's Strengths For Lowering Device Energy Consumption and Energy Lost in Data Transmission -GRENOBLE, France - Dec. 18, 2020 - CEA-Leti presented two papers this week at IEDM 2020 that confirm the advantages of combining 3D architectures and resistive-random-access-memories (RRAM) for in-memory computing (IMC), and their applications for Edge-AI and neural networks.

Physics - 17.12.2020
CEA-Leti Papers at IEDM 2020 Highlight Progress in Overcoming Challenges
Gallium Nitride Seen as Highly Efficient Replacement for Silicon in Wide Range of Consumer and Industrial Uses GRENOBLE , France - Dec. 16, 2020 - Two complementary research papers from CEA-Leti confirmed that the institute's approach to gallium-nitride (GaN) technologies is on track overcome challenges in the architecture and performance of advanced GaN devices embedding a MOS gate, and targeting the fast-growing global market for power-conversion systems.

Computer Science - 16.12.2020
CEA Institutes Combine 3D Integration Technologies & Many-Core Architectures to Enable High-Performance Processors That Will Power Exascale Computing
CEA Institutes Combine 3D Integration Technologies & Many-Core Architectures to Enable High-Performance Processors That Will Power Exascale Computing
Invited paper at IEDM 2020 shows benefit of CEA-List's architectures in co-optimizing CEA-Leti's 3D toolbox to enable higher bandwidth & heterogeneity for high-performance processors. CEA Institutes Combine 3D Integration Technologies & Many-Core Architectures to Enable High-Performance Processors That Will Power Exascale Computing S AN FRANCISCO - Dec.

Health - Life Sciences - 16.12.2020
Alzheimer’s Disease: Regulating Copper in the Brain Stops Memory Loss Among Mice
Alzheimer's disease is characterized by the presence of amyloid plaques 1 in the patient's brain. These plaques sequester copper, and contain approximately five times as much as a healthy brain. Two CNRS scientists from the Coordination Chemistry Laboratory recently developed, with their colleagues from the Guangdong University of Technology and Shenzhen University (China), a molecule that regulates the circulation of copper in the brain.

History / Archeology - Earth Sciences - 09.12.2020
New evidence: Neandertals buried their dead
New evidence: Neandertals buried their dead
Was burial of the dead practiced by Neandertals or is it an innovation specific to our species? There are indications in favour of the first hypothesis but some scientists remain sceptical. For the first time in Europe, however, a multi-disciplinary team led by researchers at the CNRS and the Muséum national d'histoire naturelle (France) and the University of the Basque Country (Spain) 1 has demonstrated, using a variety of criteria, that a Neandertal child was buried, probably around 41,000 years ago, at the Ferrassie site (Dordogne).

Environment - Earth Sciences - 07.12.2020
Getting to the bottom of Arctic landslides
Getting to the bottom of Arctic landslides
Erosion of the frozen soil of Arctic regions, known as permafrost, is creating large areas of subsidence, which has catastrophic impact in these regions sensitive to climate change. As the mechanisms behind these geological events are poorly understood, researchers from the Géosciences Paris Sud (GEOPS) laboratory (CNRS / Université Paris-Saclay), in cooperation with the Melnikov Permafrost Institute in Yakutsk, Russia, conducted a cold room 1 simulation of landslides, or slumps, caused by accelerated breakdown of the permafrost.

Environment - 07.12.2020
Nature's contributions to people found to be in decline
Nature’s contributions to people found to be in decline
Over the past 50 years, declining biodiversity has put many of nature's contributions to people at risk.  This is the conclusion reached by fifteen leading international experts, including a French ethnoecologist 1 at the CNRS (French National Centre for Scientific Research).

Physics - 02.12.2020
A French Team Has Improved the Measurement of a Fundamental Physical Constant
A French Team Has Improved the Measurement of a Fundamental Physical Constant
The validation and application of theories in physics require the measurement of universal values known as fundamental constants. A team of French researchers 1 has just conducted the most accurate measurement to date of the fine-structure constant, which characterizes the strength of interaction between light and charged elementary particles, such as electrons.

Health - Pharmacology - 01.12.2020
Deciphering the energetic code of cells for better anticancer therapies
Deciphering the energetic code of cells for better anticancer therapies
A procedure that may help personalise anticancer therapies has just been developed by the CNRS, INSERM, and Aix-Marseille University scientists at the Centre d'Immunologie de Marseille-Luminy, in association with colleagues from the University of California San Francisco and the Marseille Public University Hospital System (AP-HM), with support from Canceropôle Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur.

Astronomy / Space Science - Computer Science - 19.11.2020
Machine learning: a breakthrough in the study of stellar nurseries
Machine learning: a breakthrough in the study of stellar nurseries
Artificial intelligence can make it possible to see astrophysical phenomena that were previously beyond reach. This has now been demonstrated by scientists from the CNRS, IRAM, Observatoire de Paris-PSL, Ecole Centrale Marseille and Ecole Centrale Lille, working together in the ORION-B 1 programme. In a series of three papers published in Astronomy & Astrophysics on 19 November 2020, they present the most comprehensive observations yet carried out of one of the star-forming regions closest to the Earth.

Health - Life Sciences - 19.11.2020
Greater mosquito susceptibility to Zika virus fueled the epidemic
Greater mosquito susceptibility to Zika virus fueled the epidemic
The Zika virus has spread around the world over the last decade, causing millions of infections, some of which have been associated with congenital abnormalities and neurological disorders. Scientists from the CNRS, the Institut Pasteur, and the IRD 1 turned their attention to the main vector of the virus, the mosquito Aedes aegypti .

Health - Computer Science - 16.11.2020
How can we estimate the evolution of the reproductive number for Covid-19 in a better way?
A team of interdisciplinary researchers has demonstrated that convex optimization is an effective mathematical and numerical tool for a daily estimate of the evolution of the reproductive number for Covid-19, over time and across regions. Monitoring the spread of the Covid-19 pandemic is one of the major challenges of the global health crisis.

Physics - 09.11.2020
Kolmogorovian Active Turbulence of a Sparse Assembly of Interacting Marangoni Surfers
Publication by Laboratoire de physique in Physical Review X on June 22, 2020. Abstract Active matter, composed of self-propelled entities, forms a wide class of out-of-equilibrium systems that display striking collective behaviors, among which, the so-called active turbulence where spatially and time-disordered flow patterns spontaneously arise in a variety of active systems.

Environment - 09.11.2020
From green to orange, where does the diversity of cyanobacteria colours come from?
From green to orange, where does the diversity of cyanobacteria colours come from?
Cyanobacteria, which are often called blue algae, can actually adopt colours ranging from green to orange via pink, depending on the dominant photosynthetic pigment in the cells of particular species. Not all cyanobacteria, however, capture light in the same way: Prochlorococcus , for example, the most abundant cyanobacterium in the ocean, preferentially absorbs violet and blue wavelengths, while its cousin Synechococcus captures blue, green or both, depending on its pigment type.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 06.11.2020
Has the hidden matter of the Universe been discovered?
Has the hidden matter of the Universe been discovered?
Astrophysicists consider that around 40% of the ordinary matter that makes up stars, planets and galaxies remains undetected, concealed in the form of a hot gas in the complexe cosmic web. Today, scientists at the Institut d'Astrophysique Spatiale (CNRS/Université Paris-Saclay) may have detected, for the first time, this hidden matter through an innovative statistical analysis of 20-year-old data.  Their findings are published on November 6, 2020 in Astronomy & Astrophysics .

Physics - Chemistry - 29.10.2020
Towards next-generation molecule-based magnets
Towards next-generation molecule-based magnets
Magnets are to be found everywhere in our daily lives, whether in satellites, telephones or on fridge doors. However, they are made up of heavy inorganic materials whose component elements are, in some cases, of limited availability.   Now, researchers from the CNRS, the University of Bordeaux and the ESRF (European Synchrotron Radiation Facility in Grenoble) 1 have developed a new lightweight molecule-based magnet, produced at low temperatures, and exhibiting unprecedented magnetic properties.

Astronomy / Space Science - 27.10.2020
Surprisingly mature galaxies in the early Universe
Surprisingly mature galaxies in the early Universe
When the Universe was only a tenth of its current age its galaxies experienced a growth spurt.  It was this period that the scientists in the ALPINE project 1 focused on when they used ESO's ALMA 2 telescope to carry out the first ever large survey of distant galaxies.  To their surprise, these galaxies observed in the early stages of their life were far more mature than expected.

Earth Sciences - 23.10.2020
Deep magma facilitates the movement of tectonic plates
A small amount of molten rock located under tectonic plates encourages them to move. This is what scientists from the Laboratoire de géologie de Lyon: Terre, planètes et environnement (CNRS/ENS de Lyon/Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1) have recently discovered. Their new model takes into account not only the velocity of seismic waves but also the way in which they are attenuated by the medium they pass through.
1 2 3 4 Next »