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Earth Sciences - Aug 17
Earth Sciences
Until now, it has been assumed that the oxygenation of the oceans over geological timescales has mainly been driven by atmospheric oxygen levels. However, a new study published in Nature June 27 2022   suggests otherwise. Work by scientists at the Biogeosciences Laboratory (CNRS/UBFC), together with their colleagues at the University of California's Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, shows that the movement of tectonic plates has probably contributed to ocean oxygenation.
Health - Aug 5
Health

Ultrasound is transforming the field of neuroimaging, thanks to technological advances made over the last decade by the Physics for Medicine laboratory (Inserm, ESPCI Paris - PSL, CNRS). The introduction of functional ultrasound imaging (fUS) in 2009 provided neuroscientists with a unique technology - portable, easy to use, and reasonably priced - to visualize brain activity with high sensitivity. In 2015, another method, called ultrasound localization microscopy (ULM), produced novel images of the cerebral vascular network, revealing blood vessels just a few micrometers in diameter.

Astronomy - Jul 28

The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is the successor of the Hubble Space Telescope. JWST is designed to answer outstanding questions about our origins: from the formation of stars and planets to the birth of the first galaxies in the early Universe.

Life Sciences - Jul 29
Life Sciences

Chromosomes are fluid - almost liquid - outside their division phases. This discovery was made possible thanks to the direct mechanical manipulation, for the very first time, of chromosomes in the nucleus of living cells.

Life Sciences - Jul 28
Life Sciences

Constructing a tiny robot from DNA and using it to study cell processes invisible to the naked eye... You would be forgiven for thinking it is science fiction, but it is in fact the subject of serious research by scientists from Inserm, CNRS and Université de Montpellier at the Structural Biology Center in Montpellier


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Earth Sciences - Environment - 17.08.2022
Plate tectonics drives ocean oxygenation
Plate tectonics drives ocean oxygenation
Until now, it has been assumed that the oxygenation of the oceans over geological timescales has mainly been driven by atmospheric oxygen levels. However, a new study published in Nature June 27 2022   suggests otherwise. Work by scientists at the Biogeosciences Laboratory (CNRS/UBFC), together with their colleagues at the University of California's Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, shows that the movement of tectonic plates has probably contributed to ocean oxygenation.

Health - Life Sciences - 05.08.2022
Functional ultrasound microscopy: probing the activity of the whole brain at the microscopic level
Functional ultrasound microscopy: probing the activity of the whole brain at the microscopic level
Ultrasound is transforming the field of neuroimaging, thanks to technological advances made over the last decade by the Physics for Medicine laboratory (Inserm, ESPCI Paris - PSL, CNRS). The introduction of functional ultrasound imaging (fUS) in 2009 provided neuroscientists with a unique technology - portable, easy to use, and reasonably priced - to visualize brain activity with high sensitivity.

Life Sciences - Physics - 29.07.2022
Manipulating chromosomes in living cells reveals that they are fluid
Manipulating chromosomes in living cells reveals that they are fluid
Chromosomes are fluid - almost liquid - outside their division phases. This discovery was made possible thanks to the direct mechanical manipulation, for the very first time, of chromosomes in the nucleus of living cells. Until then, chromosomes - which are very long DNA molecules - were represented as being entangled like loose balls of yarn, and forming a sort of gel.

Astronomy / Space Science - 28.07.2022
Research INSTITUT-IphU A Long Time Ago, in a Galaxy Far, Far Away... with JWST
The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is the successor of the Hubble Space Telescope. JWST is designed to answer outstanding questions about our origins: from the formation of stars and planets to the birth of the first galaxies in the early Universe. JWST was built by an international partnership between NASA, ESA, and CSA.

Life Sciences - Physics - 28.07.2022
A 'Nano-Robot' Built Entirely from DNA to Explore Cell Processes
A ’Nano-Robot’ Built Entirely from DNA to Explore Cell Processes
Constructing a tiny robot from DNA and using it to study cell processes invisible to the naked eye. You would be forgiven for thinking it is science fiction, but it is in fact the subject of serious research by scientists from Inserm, CNRS and Université de Montpellier at the Structural Biology Center in Montpellier .

Health - Life Sciences - 20.07.2022
Pain Intensity Is Controlled by Our Internal Clock
As with many of the body's functions, pain intensity is controlled by our internal clock. This is what a team of Inserm researchers at the Lyon Neuroscience Research Center (Inserm/Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1/CNRS) has recently discovered. They show that pain oscillates over 24 hours with a peak at night and a decrease in the afternoon, regardless of the sleep-wake cycle or any external stimulation.

Life Sciences - Psychology - 19.07.2022
Questioning the universal application of neurocognitive tests
Questioning the universal application of neurocognitive tests
Human interactions are enabled by a set of neurocognitive mechanisms defined by the notion of social cognition. In order to detect patients with social cognition disorders, specialists use internationally validated evaluation tests. However, most of these tests have been developed in industrialized Western countries, which raises questions about the relevance of generalizing them to the whole of humanity.

Life Sciences - Psychology - 19.07.2022
Questioning the Universal Application of Neurocognitive Tests
Questioning the Universal Application of Neurocognitive Tests
Human interactions are enabled by a set of neurocognitive mechanisms defined by the concept of "social cognition”. In order to identify social cognition disorders, specialists use internationally validated evaluation tests. However, these are most often developed in western, industrialized countries, which could question the relevance of applying them to all humanity.

Psychology - Health - 18.07.2022
Online mindfulness meditation practice effective in improving mental health of confined students
Online mindfulness meditation practice effective in improving mental health of confined students
This study by scientists at the Institut des sciences du mouvement Etienne-Jules Marey (CNRS/Aix-Marseille Université) reveals students' psychological distress during COVID-19-related lockdown and distance learning, as well as the effectiveness of an online mindfulness meditation practice in countering it.

Health - Life Sciences - 13.07.2022
Towards a New Drug Class in the Treatment of Type 2 Diabetes
Towards a New Drug Class in the Treatment of Type 2 Diabetes
Type 2 diabetes is a major public health problem that affects millions of people worldwide. Developing new drugs to help better treat its underlying causes is therefore a research priority. In a new study coordinated by Inserm researcher Vincent Marion in collaboration with the University of Birmingham (UK), Monash University (Australia), and along with Alexander Fleming, former senior endocrinologist the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the scientists have developed PATAS, a peptide that is part of a new class of antidiabetic drugs.

Life Sciences - Health - 12.07.2022
Novel mutation associated with alternating hemiplegia of childhood
Novel mutation associated with alternating hemiplegia of childhood
Scientists at Trinity College Dublin and the Institute Imagine at Necker Hospital, Paris, announced a significant advance in our understanding of a very rare condition called alternating hemiplegia of childhood (AHC). This is a devastating condition that can lead to repeated paralysis that affects one side of the body or the other or sometimes both at once.

Life Sciences - Health - 12.07.2022
Regeneration is not a simple repetition of development
Publication of the IGFL in the journal PNAS . CNRS-INSB communication on July 12, 2022. Some organisms have the fascinating capacity to regenerate lost body parts. To which extent regeneration entails the redeployment of an embryonic developmental program is a long-standing question of regenerative studies, with implications for development, evolution, and regenerative medicine.

Life Sciences - Computer Science - 07.07.2022
CEA-Leti Barn-Owl Inspired, Object-Localization System Uses Up to ’5 Orders of Magnitude’ Less Energy than Existing Technology
GRENOBLE, France - July 7, 2022 - Inspired by the barn owl's neuroanatomy, CEA-Leti has developed an event-driven, object-localization system that couples state-of-the-art piezoelectric, ultrasound transducer sensors to a neuromorphic, resistive memories-based computational map. Presented in a paper published recently in Nature Communications , the research team describes development of an auditory-processing system that increases energy efficiency by up to five orders of magnitude compared to conventional localization systems.

Health - Pharmacology - 28.06.2022
Highly Effective Memory B Cells Localized in the Lungs
How can we increase the efficacy of vaccines used to protect against viral respiratory diseases such as influenza and COVID-19? Scientists from Inserm, CNRS and Aix-Marseille Université at the Center of Immunology Marseille-Luminy are opening up new prospects in the field, with the triggering of memory B cells directly in the lungs looking to be a promising avenue.

Paleontology - 27.06.2022
Australopithecines in South Africa are older than previously thought
Australopithecines in South Africa are older than previously thought
Australopithecus africanus individuals lived at least one million years earlier than previous dating indicated. This is the result from dating a cave deposit from the Sterkfontein site (South Africa), one of the richest in australopithecine remains, where the fossil of Mrs Ples, one of the first complete skulls of this kind of hominin, was discovered in 1947.

Health - Environment - 22.06.2022
Even at Low Doses, Exposure to the Endocrine Disruptor DEHP Impairs Tooth Development
Even at Low Doses, Exposure to the Endocrine Disruptor DEHP Impairs Tooth Development
Some endocrine disruptors have already been associated with an impaired quality of tooth enamel. After demonstrating the harmful effects of bisphenol A on tooth development, a team of researchers from Inserm, Université Paris Cité and Sorbonne Université, at the Cordeliers Research Center in Paris, in collaboration with CNRS went on to look at the effects of DEHP, an endocrine disruptor in the phthalate family, on dental development.

Environment - Life Sciences - 21.06.2022
Arctic permafrost is a reservoir of resistance genes to certain antibiotics
Arctic permafrost is a reservoir of resistance genes to certain antibiotics
Global climate change is particularly noticeable in the Arctic since it is warming twice as fast as temperate regions.

Health - 17.06.2022
In France, one adult out of four is affected by some form of hearing loss
In France, one adult out of four is affected by some form of hearing loss
Hearing loss is a public health problem affecting billions of people in all countries. However, prevalence data (i.e., schematically, their frequency in the population), as well as data describing the use of hearing aids, remain imprecise. A new study conducted by a research team from Inserm and Université Paris Cité at PARCC (Paris Cardiovascular Research Center, unit Inserm Unit 970) , in collaboration with the AP-HP and the Foch Hospital in Suresnes, shows for the first time that 25% of adults in France are affected by some form of hearing impairment.

Life Sciences - Health - 16.06.2022
Researchers described how the cerebellum modulates our ability to socialize
The cerebellum is essential for sensorimotor control but also contributes to higher cognitive functions including social behaviors. In a recent study, an international research consortium including scientists from Inserm – University of Montpellier (France), the Institut de Neurociències Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (INc-UAB) (Spain), and the University of Lausanne (Switzerland) uncovered how dopamine in the cerebellum modulates social behaviors via its action on D2 receptors (D2R).

Environment - Earth Sciences - 10.06.2022
Paname 2022: campaigns to study air quality and urban climate
Paname 2022: campaigns to study air quality and urban climate
The 2022 Paname initiative 1 aims to better understand the causes and effects of climate change in urban environments through intensive measurement campaigns planned for the Paris region this summer. From the studies, information will be derived that is key to making cities more resilient to future climate realities.
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