A ’pseudo-prion’ molecule protects the brain from Alzheimer’s disease in mice

Life Sciences - Jun 14
Life Sciences

A research team 1 led by scientists from CNRS and Université Grenoble Alpes has discovered that the injection of a modified "pseudo-prion" protein into the brains of mice could protect the animals against Alzheimer's disease, a pathology that currently affects nearly a million people in France. This neurodegenerative disease originates from lesions caused by an abnormal accumulation in the brain of two proteins: amyloid- and Tau.

Life Sciences - Jun 12

Monkey brains recognize human voices

Life Sciences

A recent study shows that neurons in monkey brains respond to human voices: a groundbreaking discovery of the neural mechanisms of vocal perception.

Discovery of a gene for immunity for rice and wheat crops

Agronomy & Food Science

The fungus Magnaporthe oryzae ravages rice and wheat crops and poses a formidable threat to human food on a global scale.

Baby baboon brain anatomy predicts which hand they will use to communicate

Life Sciences

By studying the brain anatomy of newborn baby baboons, a research group including several CNRS scientists 1 was able to predict what hand they would use to communicate after they had been weaned.

Enter the matrixes!

Computer Science

Whether performed by a human or a computer, matrix multiplication is a tedious task. Researchers are battling to reduce the time and number of steps required to solve this type of operation.

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Life Sciences - Health - 14.06.2024
A 'pseudo-prion' molecule protects the brain from Alzheimer's disease in mice
A ’pseudo-prion’ molecule protects the brain from Alzheimer’s disease in mice
A research team 1 led by scientists from CNRS and Université Grenoble Alpes has discovered that the injection of a modified "pseudo-prion" protein into the brains of mice could protect the animals against Alzheimer's disease, a pathology that currently affects nearly a million people in France. This neurodegenerative disease originates from lesions caused by an abnormal accumulation in the brain of two proteins: amyloid- and Tau.

Life Sciences - 12.06.2024
Monkey brains recognize human voices
Monkey brains recognize human voices
A recent study shows that neurons in monkey brains respond to human voices: a groundbreaking discovery of the neural mechanisms of vocal perception. The groundbreaking study, published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) on June 11, 2024, reveals a population of neurons in monkey brains that selectively respond to human voices.

Life Sciences - Health - 06.06.2024
Baby baboon brain anatomy predicts which hand they will use to communicate
Baby baboon brain anatomy predicts which hand they will use to communicate
By studying the brain anatomy of newborn baby baboons, a research group including several CNRS scientists 1 was able to predict what hand they would use to communicate after they had been weaned. These researchers had already found that nearly 70% of newborn baboons, like human babies, had early asymmetry in the planum temporale (PT) area of the brain.

Agronomy / Food Science - Health - 04.06.2024
Discovery of a gene for immunity for rice and wheat crops
The fungus Magnaporthe oryzae ravages rice and wheat crops and poses a formidable threat to human food on a global scale. Researchers from INRAE, CIRAD and the Université de Montpellier, together with the Hunan Hybrid Rice Research Centre (HHRRC) and the International Rice Research Institute (IRRI) have discovered a gene in rice for resistance to this pathogen, challenging the findings of a study that remained the reference for 25 years.

Computer Science - Mathematics - 25.05.2024
Enter the matrixes!
Enter the matrixes!
Whether performed by a human or a computer, matrix multiplication is a tedious task. Researchers are battling to reduce the time and number of steps required to solve this type of operation. Excel spreadsheets, climate modeling, simulation of aircraft wing structure, neural network calculations, image processing.

Life Sciences - Health - 23.05.2024
Mechanobiology exerts creative pressure
Mechanobiology exerts creative pressure
Numerous cellular phenomena are guided by mechanical forces, such as embryonic development or the spread of metastases. These phenomena are the subject of intense research aimed at understanding how they are translated into biological processes. Particular emphasis is being placed on new opportunities to treat diseases as resistant as cancer or fibrosis.

Life Sciences - Pharmacology - 22.05.2024
Hallucinogenic mushrooms to treat alcohol addiction
Hallucinogenic mushrooms to treat alcohol addiction
A ground-breaking study conducted by INSERM's Groupe de Recherches sur l'Alcool et les Pharmacodépendances (GRAP) opens up new therapeutic perspectives for the treatment of alcohol addiction with psilocybin, the active compound in hallucinogenic mushrooms. Published in the scientific journal Brain , their work confirms the potential of psilocybin to combat alcohol addiction, while shedding light on the molecule's hitherto unknown mechanisms of action.

Social Sciences - History / Archeology - 22.05.2024
Anthropology, a shared discipline
Since 2022, anthropology has been in the spotlight at CNRS. Caroline Bodolec, the deputy scientific director behind this initiative, looks back at the main mediation actions around the discipline after it "put on a show" on April 30, 2024. The CNRS Sciences humaines & sociales "Sharing Anthropology" focus ended on April 30.

Health - Pharmacology - 21.05.2024
Tuberculosis: a new lead for biomarkers to assess the risk of transmission
Tuberculosis is the second leading cause of death from infectious disease in the world after COVID-19. Scientists from INRAE and Inserm have discovered two subsets of neutrophils that play opposing roles in inflammatory responses to infection and could serve as biomarkers to identify individuals at risk of developing a contagious form of the disease.

Environment - Agronomy / Food Science - 17.05.2024
Preventive locust management: humanitarian crises averted
A new study, published by scientists from CIRAD and INRAE, provides a state-of-the-art assessment of the risk of Desert Locust invasions in West and North Africa, by analyzing 40 years of field data and climate records. The study reveals that preventive management measures have been successful in countering the favorable effects of climate change on outbreaks of the pest.

Health - 13.05.2024
Breast cancer: a study evaluates the time it takes to return to work
Breast cancer: a study evaluates the time it takes to return to work
After how long do women treated for breast cancer return to work? Until now, there has been little national data on this important aspect of the patient's care. A study carried out by researchers at Claude Bernard Lyon 1 University, Inserm, Gustave Eiffel University and Hospices civils de Lyon, based on data from the Assurance Maladie, has quantified this phenomenon, shedding light on the diversity of situations experienced by these women.

Health - Pharmacology - 13.05.2024
Cancer spread: targeting platelets to counter metastasis?
Scanning electron microscopy. Here we see how platelets (in blue/purple) attach to two tumour cells (in red) in a pre-clinical mouse model. Maria Jesus Garcia Leon (unit 1109 Inserm/Université de Strasbourg) What if our blood platelets , which play a major role in maintaining the integrity of our circulatory system, were not always on our side' Research teams from Inserm, Université de Strasbourg and the French Blood Establishment have studied their role in the process of metastasis formation.

Environment - 09.05.2024
Marine Protected Areas: only a third are effective
Marine Protected Areas: only a third are effective
Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) are designed to ensure the long-term conservation of marine ecosystems and the services they provide to human societies; however, only a third of these areas are capable of offering real protection on a global scale. These are the findings of a study, carried out by scientists from the CNRS 1 as part of an international research team, to be published on 9 May in Conservation Letters .

Life Sciences - Health - 07.05.2024
Vulnerability of the placenta to air pollution: what effects on the unborn child’s development?
How does exposure to air pollution affect the proper course of pregnancy and the development of the unborn child' A research team from Inserm and Université Grenoble Alpes investigated the potential effects on placental DNA of exposure to three major airborne pollutants. When comparing the data obtained from around 1 500 pregnant women, it observed that exposure to these pollutants during pregnancy was associated with epigenetic changes liable to alter the development of the foetus, particularly at the metabolic, immune and neurological levels.

Health - Life Sciences - 07.05.2024
Placental vulnerability to air pollution: what effects on the development of the unborn child?
Placental vulnerability to air pollution: what effects on the development of the unborn child?
How does exposure to air pollution during pregnancy affect the pregnancy and the development of the unborn child? A research team from Inserm and Grenoble Alpes University has investigated how placental DNA is modified by exposure to three major air pollutants. By comparing data obtained from almost 1,500 pregnant women, they were able to observe that exposure to these pollutants during pregnancy was associated with epigenetic modifications likely to alter fetal development, particularly at the metabolic, immune and neurological levels.

Health - Life Sciences - 06.05.2024
Discovery of a mechanism that allows Staphylococcus aureus to survive in blood
Staphylococcus aureus (golden staph) is one of the main causes of bacterial infection in France and throughout the world and is particularly responsible for nosocomial infections. Researchers from INRAE, the CEA and CNRS have discovered how this bacterium can survive in the hostile environment of blood.

Health - Agronomy / Food Science - 02.05.2024
Bird flu control for pandemic prevention must start before poultry reach wet markets
Bird flu control for pandemic prevention must start before poultry reach wet markets, new research finds Research published today reveals the speed at which avian influenza ('bird flu') can spread in Asia's live bird markets and the urgent need to pivot pandemic prevention strategies. The paper, from senior scientists in the GCRF One Health Poultry Hub, describes how a computer model of avian influenza virus transmission was for the first time input with biological data obtained from chickens in live bird markets (also known as wet markets).

Health - Environment - 02.05.2024
Modeling avian influenza in Asian poultry markets
A new study involving INRAE reveals the speed at which bird flu is spreading in live poultry markets in Asia. Scientists from the One Health Poultry Hub program have modeled the spread of avian flu in these markets, integrating for the first time biological data collected in the field. They focused their study on the H9N2 avian flu virus, which is not very virulent for poultry, but represents a major risk in the spread and evolution of the disease.

Life Sciences - 01.05.2024
Cell contraction drive the initial shaping of human embryos
Cell contraction drive the initial shaping of human embryos
Human embryo compaction, an essential step in the first days of an embryo's development, is driven by the contractility of its cells. This is the finding of a team of scientists from CNRS, Institut Curie, Inserm, AP-HP and the Collège de France. Published in the 1 May edition of Nature, these results contradict the presupposed driving role of cell adhesion in this phenomenon and pave the way for improved assisted reproductive technology (ART) .

Life Sciences - 01.05.2024
Cell contraction drive the initial shaping of human embryos
Human embryo compaction, an essential step in the first days of an embryo's development, is driven by the contractility of its cells. This is the finding of a team of scientists from CNRS, Institut Curie, Inserm, AP-HP and the Collège de France. Published in the 1 May edition of Nature, these results contradict the presupposed driving role of cell adhesion in this phenomenon and pave the way for improved assisted reproductive technology (ART) .
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